The MINI Cooper – the synonym for driving fun for over 60 years.

BMW:The MINI Cooper – the synonym for driving fun for over 60 years.

Munich. For automotive fans with manual skills, the
premises in the London suburb of Surbiton must have been a paradise.
Scrap metal everywhere, car parts, tyres and a dedicated father
screwing on cars and bikes in a garage. And in the middle of it, a
certain John Cooper, who created the basis for an extraordinary career
as an engineer of racing cars right there immediately after the end of
the Second World War. To this day, his name is not only associated
with great successes in Formula One, but also with the particularly
sporty models of the MINI brand. It was thanks to John Cooper’s
commitment that a more powerful model variant of the revolutionary
small car came onto the market just two years after the classic Mini
was introduced in 1959. The Mini Cooper immediately impressed with its
spirited power delivery and high agility. Even 60 years later, the
names of the tradition-steeped British car manufacturer and the
legendary sports car engineer are remarkably often mentioned in the
same context when it comes to maximum driving fun with minimal
external dimensions.

The basis for this connection is the truly authentic sporting spirit.
In Great Britain, the desire to race reawakened soon after the end of
the war. All over the country, tracks were marked out and competitions
held. John Cooper had the talent and ambition to make his mark on this
scene. He was just 23 years old when he and his father Charles founded
the Cooper Car Company in 1946, which soon developed and built
successful Formula 3 and Formula 2 racing cars. The son’s inventive
spirit culminated in the construction of a new type of Formula 1
racing car in which the engine did not work in front of the driver, as
was customary at the time, but behind him. Cooper celebrated his first
victories with it in 1958. In 1959 and 1960, Jack Brabham even became
world champion on Cooper. And the revolutionary mid-engine principle
established itself permanently in Grand Prix racing. Cooper’s team
remained active in Formula 1 until the end of the 1960s. Among the
most famous pilots, besides Jack Brabham, were Sir Stirling Moss,
Bruce McLaren and Jochen Rindt.

While his groundbreaking Formula 1 racing cars have long been
history, John Cooper’s influence on the sporting driving experience in
production vehicles lives on until today. In this field, too, it all
began with a revolutionary design. While John Cooper was busy making
his mark on formula racing, engineer Alec Issigonis had developed a
new small car for the British Motor Corporation. With an exterior
length of just over three metres, the classic Mini offered an
astonishing amount of space for four passengers and their luggage.
Issigonis had arranged the engine transversely at the front, with the
gearbox directly below. Wheels positioned far out and short overhangs
did the rest. With its transversely positioned four-cylinder engine
and front-wheel drive, the classic Mini provided the basis for a
design for small and compact cars that was completely new at the time
and is still in use today.

The classic Mini started with an engine output of 34 hp, but it was
light and exhibited strikingly agile cornering performance thanks to
front-wheel drive, a wide track and a torsionally rigid body. While
Issigonis primarily had a low-priced and economical vehicle for
everyone in mind, John Cooper immediately recognised the sporting
potential of the classic Mini. The two ingenious engineers had already
met during joint racing activities, later also cultivated business
relations and developed an intimate friendship over time.
Nevertheless, it took a lot of persuasion to raise the sporting
temperament of the classic Mini. With the blessing of the BMC
management, John Cooper therefore initially had a small series of
1,000 vehicles built, whose modified engine, expanded in displacement
to just under 1.0 litres, generated 55 hp, which was enough for a top
speed of 135 km/h. Cooper also provided a closer-ratio gearbox, a
better-guided gear lever, disc brakes on the front wheels and wider
tyres. In addition, the roof was colour-contrasted and the interior
was two-tone. Thus, the first Mini Cooper came onto the market in
September 1961.

The reactions were euphoric and left only one wish unfulfilled: even
more power. Cooper and Issigonis, who had become convinced of the
sporting talent of the classic Mini, increased the engine capacity to
1071 cubic centimetres. This increased the output to 70 hp. The
chassis technology provided another important boost for the classic
Mini’s sporting career: Issigonis had also broken new ground in the
areas of steering and wheel suspension, thus laying the foundation for
the go-kart feeling that is still famous today. Homokinetic universal
joints reduced the influence of the drive on the steering, a subframe
to which the rear wheels were also attached improved directional
stability, a rubber suspension and small telescopic shock absorbers
ensured fine response and progressive spring action.

The Mini Cooper was immediately successful on racetracks and rally
tracks. It became a legend with its appearances at the Monte Carlo
Rally. In 1963, the Finn Rauno Aaltonen achieved the first class
victory. In addition to trophies, the Mini Cooper gained more and more
popularity year after year during its appearances. Its success in
competition with numerous much larger and more powerful rivals made it
a favourite with the public. The acclaimed highlights were the overall
victories achieved with the Mini Cooper S at the Monte Carlo Rally in
1964, 1965 and 1967. Only then did the rally career of the classic
Mini draw to a close.

On the road, the Mini Cooper thrilled its fans from 1961 to 1971,
during which time its model designation became synonymous with
passionate driving fun. The name John Cooper remained consistently
present among fans of the classic Mini. The tuning kits developed by
Cooper for Mini production vehicles met with great demand in the 1970s
and 1980s. In 1990, the Mini Cooper returned to the model range. The
1.3-litre four-cylinder engine with initially 61 hp now worked under
the short bonnet. Thus, fans once again conquered the hairpin bends
and serpentines of this world with an agile and sporty Mini Cooper.
This version with 63 hp was built until autumn 2000. The successor was
already ready for take-off at that time.

The takeover of the Rover Group by BMW at the beginning of 1994
opened up completely new perspectives for the MINI brand. At the
International Motor Show (IAA) in Frankfurt in 1997, the study of a
MINI Cooper was presented, which offered the prospect of a new edition
of the unique British small car. As a modern interpretation of the
traditional vehicle concept, it combined the classic values of its
predecessor with the requirements of a modern automobile on the
threshold of the 21st century. Thus, in 2001, the new MINI saw the
streetlight of the world.

The new MINI was bigger, chicer, more colourful and, of course,
technically up to date. And it also transferred the typical go-kart
feeling of the classic Mini into the modern era. At the same time, the
MINI produced in Oxford, England, presented itself as the first
premium vehicle in the small car segment. Unlike the classic one, the
MINI Cooper was now immediately part of the starting line-up. With a
maximum output of 85 kW/115 hp, it lived up to its name. Engine and
chassis design immediately formed a harmonious alliance for maximum
driving pleasure. The four-cylinder engine, once again mounted
transversely at the front, now had a displacement of 1.6 litres. Its
power enabled the MINI Cooper to sprint from standstill to 100 km/h in
9.2 seconds and to reach a top speed of 197 km/h. The high-quality
chassis technology of the MINI Cooper included McPherson struts on the
front axle, axle shafts of equal length and a multi-link rear axle
unique in the small car segment, disc brakes on all four wheels as
well as the DSC (Dynamic Stability Control) driving stability system.

The desire for even more power was also fulfilled with the modern
MINI. The 120 kW/163 hp MINI Cooper S followed as early as autumn 2001.

In November 2006, the new edition of the modern MINI was launched
with an evolutionary design development and a fundamental technical
overhaul. “From the Original to the Original”, the MINI’s
visual appearance, which has received the highest marks of approval,
was refined in numerous details, which in particular emphasised the
sporting virtues of the compact curve artist even more clearly. The
MINI Cooper with 88 kW/120 hp and the MINI Cooper S with 128 kW/175
hp, which were available at the time of their market launch,
immediately impressed with their enhanced performance and
significantly reduced fuel consumption and emissions. Two years later,
the sporty characteristics of a Mini Cooper could also be experienced
for the first time with a highly efficient diesel engine. In the MINI
Cooper D, 81 kW/110 hp, and in the Mini Cooper SD, which was
introduced shortly afterwards, 125 kW/170 hp provided a powerful drive.

When developing the modern MINI around the turn of the millennium,
Mike Cooper had already brought the know-how gathered in his family
into the project. John Cooper’s son was passionately committed to
particularly sporty versions of the MINI. In the following years, the
tradition-steeped connection became even closer. At the beginning of
2007, the BMW Group acquired the brand rights of John Cooper Garages.
As a result of this arrangement, the John Cooper Works brand has been
an official part of the MINI brand since 2008. Since then, the
extremely sporty John Cooper Works models have represented the maximum
power and performance that can be experienced in a MINI.

Even in the current model generation, the MINI Cooper is the epitome
of an extra portion of driving fun, which is now realised in a wide
variety of forms. With a three-cylinder petrol engine under the
bonnet, it now produces 100 kW/136 hp. In addition, the Cooper name is
anchored in the entire range of the current model programme. The
brand’s first all-electric model is called the MINI Cooper SE (power
consumption combined: 17.6 – 15.2 kWh/100 km according to WLTP; CO2
emissions combined: 0 g/km). Powered by a 135 kW/184 hp electric
motor, it combines sustainable mobility with characteristic driving
pleasure, expressive design and premium quality. On the other side of
the spectrum is the new MINI John Cooper Works GP (fuel consumption
combined: 7.3 l/100 km; CO2 emissions combined: 167 g/km according to
WLTP). It is powered by a 225 kW/306 hp four-cylinder turbo engine,
making it the fastest MINI ever registered for the road. Whether
locally emission-free in everyday urban traffic or with the
irrepressible urge to take to the racetrack: every MINI with the
Cooper name in the model designation carries the unique British
sporting spirit of an association that has existed for 60 years.

 

In case of queries, please contact:

Corporate Communications

Julian Kisch, Press Spokesperson Product Communications MINI
Tel.: +49-89-382-38072
E-mail: julian.kisch@mini.com

Andreas Lampka, Head of Communications MINI
Tel.: +49-89-382-23662
E-mail: andreas.lampka@mini.com

Jennifer Treiber-Ruckenbrod, Head of Communications MINI and BMW Motorrad
Tel.: +49-89-382-35108
E-mail: jennifer.ruckenbrod@bmwgroup.com

The BMW Group

With its four brands BMW, MINI, Rolls-Royce and BMW Motorrad, the
BMW Group is the world’s leading premium manufacturer of automobiles
and motorcycles and also provides premium financial and mobility
services. The BMW Group production network comprises 31 production
and assembly facilities in 15 countries; the company has a global
sales network in more than 140 countries.

In 2020, the BMW Group sold over 2.3 million passenger vehicles
and more than 169,000 motorcycles worldwide. The profit before tax
in the financial year 2020 was € 5.222 billion on revenues amounting
to € 98.990 billion. As of 31 December 2020, the BMW Group had a
workforce of 120,726 employees.

The success of the BMW Group has always been based on long-term
thinking and responsible action. The company set the course for the
future at an early stage and consistently makes sustainability and
efficient resource management central to its strategic direction,
from the supply chain through production to the end of the use phase
of all products.

www.bmwgroup.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/BMWGroup
Twitter: http://twitter.com/BMWGroup
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/BMWGroupView
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bmwgroup

Original Press Release

Berlin, Berlin . . . : In the MINI John Cooper Works GP through the German capital.

BMW:Berlin, Berlin . . . : In the MINI John Cooper Works GP through the German capital.

Munich. The atmosphere crackles – something is in the
air of Berlin. On the Glienicke Bridge, passers-by are amazed. Agent
exchange? No, there was something like that before, actually, only
three times between 1962 and 1986. Now it is the MINI John Cooper
Works GP (fuel consumption combined: 7.3 l/100 km; CO2 emissions
combined: 167 g/km according to WLTP) that catches the eye. The
fastest MINI ever built is also rarely seen. The 225 kW/306 hp model
was built in a small series of only 3000 units.

The MINI John Cooper Works GP is actually too spirited for city
traffic. But its agile handling characteristics and compact dimensions
are extremely helpful in the hustle of the metropolis with its almost
four million inhabitants. And the impressive charisma, which is
provided by wheel arch trims made of carbon, a roof spoiler with
double-wing contour, 18-inch lightweight forged wheels and a
model-specific suspension with vehicle lowering, fits perfectly into
the image of a city where big appearances play a big role.

The most modern top sports car in the model range of the traditional
British brand approaches the capital from the south-west, where
history and modernity merge in a unique way. And this already begins
on the Glienicke Bridge, which has been still a simple wooden bridge
350 years ago. But due to the growing volume of traffic it became part
of one of the most important connecting routes between the residential
cities of Berlin and Potsdam. Today, the route leads via Königsstraße
to the city motorway 115 through Grunewald. This is where the
“Automobile Traffic and Practice Road” was opened 100 years
ago. In its original layout of around 19 kilometres, the AVUS
connected today’s exhibition grounds near the Charlottenburg district
and Nikolassee near Zehlendorf with two straights and a north and a
south curve.

Race track operations were discontinued in 1998, and the striking
administration building on Messedamm and the 200-metre-long spectator
grandstand are listed buildings now. Today the MINI John Cooper Works
GP brings back a little racing feeling. Its four-cylinder turbo engine
accelerates it from a standstill to 100 km/h in 5.2 seconds. The
precisely controllable sports brake system with four-piston fixed
calliper disc brakes on the front wheels guarantees equally dynamic
deceleration maneuvers. In fast bends, the aerodynamically optimised
design features ensure reduced lift, while a top speed of 265 km/h is
possible on long straights. In theory, anyway, because today the speed
limit on the AVUS is 100 km/h.

On the Teufelsberg, which is very close to the former Nordkurve,
visitors have a great view over the Grunewald and Berlin – no wonder,
at 120.1 metres, the Teufelsberg is the second highest elevation in
the city. Contemporary spray art can also be admired there. Hundreds
of small and large murals have been created on the walls of a former
radar station over the past decades.

After a brief stop at the Olympic Stadium, the MINI John Cooper Works
GP heads for the Mitte district. On Bundesstraße 2, the 67-metre-high
Victory Column soon comes into view. The MINI circles the “Großer
Stern” (Great Star) once (or twice or three times?), as the
partially five-lane roundabout is called, and then along the “Straße
des 17. Juni” right in front of the Brandenburger Tor. Turn right
once, and after just a few hundred metres the two-seater becomes an
eye-catcher at Potsdamer Platz. Europe’s first traffic lights were
located there in 1924. At that time, this intersection was one of the
busiest places in the old world. The contrast was all the greatest
when Potsdamer Platz became a no-man’s land after the Second World War
as a place between the American and Soviet occupation zones. After the
fall of the Berlin Wall, however, the historic square quickly became a
vibrant hotspot again.

From modern Potsdamer Platz, the path leads to the Kreuzberg district
and there to a historic shopping opportunity. Market Hall 9 on
Eisenbahnstraße was opened 130 years ago. There was space for 300
stalls, each four square metres in size, to supply the people with
fresh goods. It is one of 14 Berlin market halls that were built in
the second half of the 19th century. Today, “shopping
differently” and “eating differently” are now taking
part. Traders and customers value seasonal products and regional sources.

From Kreuzberg, all it takes is a short hop across the Spree or a
brisk ride over the Oberbaum Bridge to reach one of Berlin’s most
visited tourist spots, the East Side Gallery. It was opened in
September 1990 and comprises the longest remaining section of the
Berlin Wall. 118 artists from 21 countries created the world’s longest
open-air gallery on 1.3 kilometres of the former border after the fall
of the Wall.

If you now follow the Spree, you will arrive at Alexanderplatz and
from there via the magnificent boulevard “Unter den Linden”, past the
TV Tower, the Berlin Cathedral, the Gendarmenmarkt and the Humboldt
Forum in the rebuilt City Palace directly into the government
district. History and the present are very close together here between
the Reichstag building, the main railway station, the Chancellery and
Bellevue Palace, the seat of the Federal President.

On the way through Charlottenburg and to the International Congress
Centre (ICC), the driver of the MINI John Cooper Works GP has to
decide. Either he takes another trip over the AVUS into the Grunewald
and over the Glienicke Bridge to Potsdam, or he heads north into the
green countryside surrounding Berlin. The choice falls on the
excursion to the Mecklenburg Seenland. Because in the middle of the
Schorfheide, the MINI John Cooper Works GP can once again demonstrate
what it’s made of. Europe’s largest driving safety centre has existed
in Groß Dölln since 2002. The area includes not only a unique handling
course, but also a 4.25-kilometre race track.

On this terrain, you can experience just how much the developers of
the MINI John Cooper Works GP have used their racing know-how to
create extreme driving pleasure. A particularly tight engine mount,
the rigid body structure, the differential lock integrated into the
8-speed Steptronic Sport transmission and the model-specific
high-performance tyres enable a fascinatingly spontaneous development
of power when sprinting from a standstill and accelerating out of
bends. The no less impressive lateral acceleration results, among
other things, from a wide track and model-specific increased camber
values for the front and rear wheels. In GP Mode, the intervention
thresholds of the DSC (Dynamic Stability Control) system are also
raised. This gives the driver a little more leeway when approaching
the limits. GP Mode can be activated quite simply with a toggle
switch. And once again there is a certain crackle in the air.

In case of queries, please contact:

Corporate Communications

Julian Kisch, Press Spokesperson Product Communications MINI
Tel.: +49-89-382-38072
E-mail: julian.kisch@mini.com

Andreas Lampka, Head of Communications MINI
Tel.: +49-89-382-23662
E-mail: andreas.lampka@mini.com


Jennifer Treiber-Ruckenbrod, Head of Communications MINI and BMW Motorrad
Tel.: +49-89-382-35108
E-mail: jennifer.ruckenbrod@bmwgroup.com

The BMW Group

With its four brands BMW, MINI, Rolls-Royce and BMW Motorrad, the
BMW Group is the world’s leading premium manufacturer of automobiles
and motorcycles and also provides premium financial and mobility
services. The BMW Group production network comprises 31 production
and assembly facilities in 15 countries; the company has a global
sales network in more than 140 countries.

In 2020, the BMW Group sold over 2.3 million passenger vehicles
and more than 169,000 motorcycles worldwide. The profit before tax
in the financial year 2020 was € 5.222 billion on revenues amounting
to € 98.990 billion. As of 31 December 2020, the BMW Group had a
workforce of 120,726 employees.

The success of the BMW Group has always been based on long-term
thinking and responsible action. The company set the course for the
future at an early stage and consistently makes sustainability and
efficient resource management central to its strategic direction,
from the supply chain through production to the end of the use phase
of all products.

www.bmwgroup.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/BMWGroup
Twitter: http://twitter.com/BMWGroup
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/BMWGroupView
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bmwgroup

 

Original Press Release

Statement Oliver Zipse, Chairman of the Board of Management of BMW AG, Conference Call Quarterly Statement to 30 September 2021

BMW:Statement Oliver Zipse, Chairman of the Board of Management of BMW AG, Conference Call Quarterly Statement to 30 September 2021

A very warm welcome to all of you!

The BMW Group is profitable and the company is growing. This is
thanks to our customers around the world as well as the strong demand
for our diverse range of products and drivetrain technologies.

We delivered 1.9 million BMW, MINI and Rolls-Royce vehicles to
customers in the first nine months of the year as well as 156,000 BMW
motorcycles and scooters. This represents an increase of 18 and 21
percent respectively above the previous year. BMW once again gained
market share and captured 3.4 percent of the global market as a
premium manufacturer.

We were also able to expand our strong competitive position in key
markets, such as the US and China. BMW leads the premium segment in
numerous countries. In addition to China and the US, this is also the
case in Mexico, Brazil and other markets in South America, as well as
South Africa and several European countries, including our domestic
market of Germany.

This shows that: We are maintaining our successful business
development.
And we can therefore confirm our adjusted guidance
for 2021. Our profitability is of extreme importance. In this way, we
are laying the foundation for continued investment in relevant future
areas of activity. This ambidexterity is needed now more than ever.
Just think about the ambitious political guidelines, diversified
economic and social developments around the world, new technological
possibilities and geopolitical tensions, and many other examples.

As a global company, we have a responsibility to ensure the BMW
Group’s business model is viable in the long term under all possible
conditions. On the one hand, this means we have to approach short-term
changes in our environment with flexibility, but also with
consistency. At the same time, we continue to follow our strategic
direction in line with our long-term goals and are making the
necessary decisions.

I would like to discuss these two perspectives in more detail today:

  • What are we focused on right now?
  • And how are we setting ourselves up for the years after 2025?

Directly to the first point:

This year, we demonstrated once again that we are capable of
overcoming difficult situations: This applies equally to the lingering
effects of the coronavirus pandemic, as well as to the current
situation with semiconductor supplies. Our Divisions Purchasing,
Development and Production as well as Sales and Marketing are working
together very closely on this and exhausting all possibilities. Our
stable and trustful relationships with suppliers worldwide also mean
that we have been able to cushion the impact for our customers better
than many of our competitors.

Not only all our brands, but also all major regions of the world saw
significant growth until September: Europe: more than 10 percent.
Asia: almost 20 percent. The Americas: over 30 percent. Other markets
grew by almost 30 percent.

As expected, and as previously announced, the sales momentum for our
electrified vehicles is particularly strong: Our deliveries of
electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids doubled between January and
September, compared to the previous year. Our BEV sales were even 120
percent higher year-on-year.

Our new innovation flagships, the BMW i4 and BMW iX, have recently
begun rolling off the production line. Both are pre-ordered several
months out. Many members of the media and car experts from around the
world have already experienced the i4 and the iX for themselves and
they were thrilled.

We on the Board of Management get to test our products on a regular
basis, of course. But recently, our senior managers had the same
opportunity. They drove almost 600 km in the iX, from Munich to just
outside Cologne – fully electric and with all the latest digital
features. Their conclusion: E-mobility has fully arrived in our
everyday lives.

However, the charging infrastructure isn’t keeping up. Here in
Germany and all across Europe, it needs to be expanded swiftly and
noticeably – while also being binding and ambitious. I am also
advocating for this as ACEA president. The growth of electric cars
already exceeds the growth of current charging capacity in Germany by
factor of five. Many EU countries still don’t have a charging network
at all. Without a coherent framework, no technology can be implemented
or become widely accepted. This applies to both e-mobility and
hydrogen. That is why the next steps towards tighter CO2
reductions in Europe after 2030 should only be decided based on the
charging infrastructure that has actually been built by then. A review
in 2028 can then define the right specifications for the rest of the journey.

A fundamental requirement is that our customers are already
enthusiastic about e-drives today. And we can state that we are on the
right track here. To quote a recent headline: “The best 4 Series is
electric” – the new BMW i4 is getting a lot of praise like this. This
is how we create desirability. We are building the new i4 at our
oldest plant – where people of more than 50 nationalities work
together, right in the heart of the city.

Please allow me a brief digression – because this is where the change
is most visible: We are gradually relocating our engine production to
other sites – without cutting jobs. Instead, an assembly plant for
electric cars is being built on the same site. That gets us moving
quickly: By 2023, at least half of all vehicles from Plant Munich will
have an electrified drive train – the overwhelming majority of them
fully electric. With its new vehicle assembly, the plant will also be
able to produce up to 100 percent BEVs from 2026 onwards. This will be
determined entirely by demand. That is how systematic transformation
works. At the same time, we are also working on emission-free
transport logistics for our main plant.

No one will get left behind. We have already trained more than 50,000
specialists worldwide for e-mobility. Starting this month, the i4 and
iX will also be available alongside our electric pioneer, the BMW i3;
our successful urban model, the MINI SE*; and the BMW iX3*, which is
built in China. Over the next two years, these will be joined by fully
electric versions of the high-volume BMW 5 Series and X1, as well as
the 7 Series.

What does this mean for our customers?

By 2023, we will have at least one fully electric model in about 90
percent of our current market segments – giving our customers the
ability to choose. Nevertheless, we still have a long way to go until
all customers in all countries around the world are able to rely
solely on electric driving. But, when it comes to climate protection,
every single gram of CO2 that we can avoid today counts.
Why should we commit to a single technical solution early in the
process, when that means leaving considerable potential untapped in
the here and now?

This explicitly includes further CO2 reductions through
the use of state-of-the-art conventional drive technologies. From 2022
onwards, our modular motors will receive second generation 48-volt technology.

This leads to a further significant increase in efficiency. For some
models that now jump straight into the second stage, this can result
in less CO2 of up to 20 percent. We need competition
between technologies – in the interest of customers and for less
CO2. Anything else would put us on a consolidation course.
Our intelligent vehicle architectures will allow us to continue to
offer markets worldwide the right technologies for their individual
circumstances and pace of change.

Let’s move on to my second point:

How are we setting ourselves up for the years after 2025?

We see technological change as a tremendous opportunity to strengthen
our business model for the long term. Technology can protect the
climate. We are systematically gearing the BMW Group towards climate
neutrality. What does that include?

First:

Continuing to ramp up e-mobility for all our brands. MINI and
Rolls-Royce will be exclusively all-electric from the early 2030s. We
will be taking our core BMW brand into a new fully electric dimension
with the NEUE KLASSE from 2025 onwards. The same applies to the
digital experience of mobility for our customers.

Second:
Our strong commitment to climate-neutral mobility. To
achieve this, we have again tightened our ambitious sustainability
goals for the supply chain, production and the use phase.

And thirdly:
Our focus on the circular economy. We showed what
this looks like in practice at the IAA Mobility:
We have
received extremely positive feedback worldwide on the BMW i Vision
Circular. It is made of 100-percent recycled material and is itself
100-percent recyclable. We don’t just make announcements; we let our
actions speak for themselves. For the NEUE KLASSE, for example, we are
sourcing “green” steel – manufactured using hydrogen and green power –
from Swedish start up H2 Green Steel. In this way, we can drastically
reduce CO2 emissions starting at the very beginning of the
supply chain.

The real question, after all, is: What is a vehicle’s overall carbon
footprint throughout its lifecycle – from the use of raw materials,
through industrial manufacturing and active use, all the way to recycling?

The credibility of this is measured by whether concrete action can be
verified at the end. That is why the BMW Group became the first German
automotive manufacturer to join the Business Ambition for 1.5 degrees.
This entails a commitment to climate neutrality by 2050.

Our path to achieving this is scientifically validated, transparent
and measurable. It is absolutely clear: Resources are becoming
increasingly scarce – and, as a result, prices for raw materials are
rising. That is why we are already thinking about the next logical
step in the transformation: how to significantly reduce our resource
consumption. This will be a crucial lever to achieving sustainable
development and profitable growth in the future.

The BMW Group will gradually increase the percentage of secondary
material it uses in its vehicles to 50 percent. This is a challenge
for all of us. That is why we can no longer think in a fragmented way.
In light of the ongoing UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, I
will address these issues at the COP’s Sustainable Innovation Forum
next Monday. Our shared goal of lowering CO2 emissions
quickly and on a massive scale demands cooperation at the global
level. This applies specifically to CO2 pricing.
We
support pricing as the most efficient measure to curb carbon emissions
– provided it is regulated across national borders and in a uniform
manner. It is very important that the steering effect of policy is
aimed in this direction.

In all sectors, sustainability and digitisation have long been
closely linked. That is precisely why we have established the
industrial flagship project Catena-X – which we now seek to strengthen further.

Catena-X creates transparency, from small suppliers to OEMs. This
cross-sectoral connectivity is a real advantage for Europe as a
manufacturing location. Today’s modern vehicles are already shaped
largely by software. With research and development activities at 10
locations worldwide – our own and, also, at our joint ventures – we
have a total of around 10,000 IT and software specialists working on
digitisation of vehicles. We have been moving forward with
connectivity in our vehicles for more than two decades. And we are
seeing this again right now:

By the end of this year, the BMW Group will have the world’s largest
fleet of vehicles on the road with “over-the-air” update and upgrade
capabilities. With Remote Software Upgrade, our vehicles always have
the very latest technology – just like the updates we are all used to
on our smartphones.

This benefits our customers directly: Their vehicle is not only
always up to date; it also keeps on getting better because we can
access every line of programming code in the vehicle. Our customers
can also purchase or subscribe to new functions and features. With
high-end connectivity, such as 5G in the iX, our vehicles are
transformed into a smart device within the customer’s own digital ecosystem.

Standardisation is key to the digitisation of cars.

We believe it makes sense to develop common, standardised basic
elements for vehicle operating systems in conjunction with other OEMs
and suppliers. The use of open-source software is highly relevant in
this respect – to make sure we are all speaking the same language.
There is no need to reinvent the wheel. We can ensure a high level of
economic efficiency and, at the same time, make use of existing
digital ecosystems, such as Google’s Android Open-Source Project.

In this process, we are working with tech players like Apple, Amazon,
Tencent, Google and Intel – while still competing with them. I see
this less as a clash between OEMs and tech giants, and more as an
expression of the market reality in the digital age and a way to
guarantee further progress.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

In a multi-layered transformation process, employees are a meaningful
seismograph that provides a valuable indication of the state of a
company.
We received over 100,000 responses to our Employee
Survey in October – the highest ever. And the results show a very
positive trend in all categories compared to the surveys in 2017 and
2019. They showed that the vast majority of our global team are
confident about the future of the BMW Group – across all divisions and
hierarchy levels.

This spirit and optimism demonstrate to me that:

  • Our team really sees the transformation as an opportunity.
  • We have the right balance of disruption and stability.
  • We consistently combine change and responsibility.

We are finding solutions and moving fast – and taking our people
along with us. This is how the BMW Group will remain on course for
long-term success – by being profitable, innovative and responsible.
Thank you!

*Consumption/emissions data:

MINI Cooper SE: Power consumption in kWh/100 km
combined: 16.9-14.9 NEDC, 17.6-15.2 WLTP.

BMW iX3: Power consumption in kWh/100 km combined:
18.9-18.5 WLTP.

 

Original Press Release

Goodwood, steam and old castles: through West Sussex in the MINI Cooper S 5-door.

BMW:Goodwood, steam and old castles: through West Sussex in the MINI Cooper S 5-door.

Munich. At the time, no one could have known that the
young pharmacist’s assistant and assistant teacher, who earned a
little money in the small English town of Midhurst, West Sussex, at
the beginning of 1881, would become one of the greats of science
fiction literature. His name: Herbert George Wells, the later creator
of classics such as “War of the Worlds” and “The Time
Machine”. Can there be a better place than Midhurst to explore as
part of the history of southern England with a modern time machine
like the MINI Cooper S 5-door (fuel consumption combined: 6.8 -6.2
l/100 km according to WLTP; CO2 emissions combined: 154 – 141 g/km
according to WLTP), which transfers the principle of creative use of
space once conceived for the classic Mini to the present in a
particularly convincing way?

Midhurst itself, a town of 5,000 people in the county of West Sussex,
is definitely worth a visit. It is located in the middle of the South
Downs National Park, the youngest of the 15 national parks in England
and Wales. The ruins of Tudor Cowdray House and Victorian Cowdray
House give a first glimpse of the rich architectural heritage England
has to offer. Georgian, Victorian and Edwardian architecture meet
here, and the old market square has long been the meeting place for
relaxed residents.

No less narrow than the lanes in Midhurst are the small country roads
that cross the national park. In typical English style, bushes and
trees stand right at the edge of the tarmac ribbons, and pheasants
poke their heads through the thicket or dash across the narrow
carriageway every now and then.

These tracks are the ideal terrain for a compact sports car like the
MINI Cooper S 5-door, which can demonstrate its temperament here with
its 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine with MINI TwinPower Turbo
technology. The drivetrain generates a maximum of 131 kW/178 hp and
accelerates the MINI Cooper S 5-door from zero to 100 km/h in 6.8
seconds. Enough power to swiftly overtake the many agricultural
vehicles used here for cattle farming and fruit growing.

Those who want to explore the surrounding area of Midhurst have
plenty of choice, as almost every village has a story to tell. We
first decide to take a detour north to the Hollycombe Steam Collection
at Liphook on the northern edge of the national park. Here, among
other things, is an almost complete and usable steam fair from
Edwardian times.

After so much early industrial culture, we’re happy to climb back
into our ultra-modern MINI, which gleams in Island Blue metallic and
catches the eye with its roof and exterior mirror caps in silver, its
18-inch Pulse Spoke 2-tone alloy wheels and Piano Black exterior,
among other features. The redesigned and standard sports leather
steering wheel with its multi-function button panels fits perfectly in
the hand – it’s time to explore more of West Sussex.

To do this, the route leads south-east, past Petworth with its
impressive baroque Petworth House, which houses a collection of old
masters. But the place is also known for its literature festival in
November. If you want to visit the ancient Romans, you only have to
drive a few kilometres further south: In Bignor, the remains of a
Roman villa were discovered by chance while ploughing in 1811.
Beautiful mosaic floors and ceramics can still be seen today, the
oldest pieces dating back to the first century AD.

After another short drive, the MINI reaches Amberley – and anyone
interested in technology should not drive past the Railway Museum
there. Here, narrow-gauge trains built in 1880 and later roll along
old tracks with a gauge of 610 millimetres. Their bizarreness already
impressed the makers of the James Bond episode “A View to a Kill”
in the 1980s.

In the neighbourhood of the River Rother, which at 56 kilometres is
one of the longest rivers in Sussex and also flows through the middle
of Midhurst, the A284 country road continues south to Arundel with its
incredibly large castle. It is the seat of the Dukes of Norfolk, the
first buildings having been built in 1068. Also worth seeing is the
Parish Church of St Nicholas, built in 1380, and Hiorne Tower – an
ornamental 18th century building in Arundel Park, last occupied in the 1950s.

Next to it is the English Channel and Bognor Regis, one of the famous
southern English seaside resorts. So unpack your swimwear from the
luggage compartment of the MINI Cooper S 5-door. The luggage
compartment holds 278 litres when all five seats are in use and can be
expanded to 941 litres with only two occupants when the standard 60/40
split rear seat backrest is folded down. Well refreshed, the road now
leads inland again, to Chichester. The city is much more than just the
administrative seat of West Sussex – its cathedral is famous, for
example, but also its reputation as a shopping hotspot thanks to
designer boutiques and art galleries.

Not far from Chichester is the paradise of all fans of classic cars
and sports and luxury cars: Goodwood. A visit is a must because,
firstly, Goodwood House with its large and beautiful estates is an
ideal place to relax. Secondly, the hilly aristocratic grounds with
its integrated race track host the incomparable Festival of Speed and
the Goodwood Revival every year. And thirdly, the BMW Group, to which
MINI also belongs, builds automotive luxury in the Duke of Richmond’s
large garden: cars of the Rolls-Royce brand have been manufactured
here since 2003.

The route leads back towards Midhurst through the heathland of West
Sussex and the ridges of the South Downs and the Weald as the highest
elevations. This is where the new Adaptive Suspension of the MINI
Cooper S 5-door comes into its own. Frequency-selective damping
ensures an optimised balance between sportiness and ride comfort.

An additional valve ensures that the damping forces are adjusted
extremely quickly, so that the harmonious driving characteristics
remain unaffected by the not exactly rare bumps in the English road
surface. And the go-kart feeling – typical of the brand – can be felt
in every one of the many bends.

After a stop at the Weald and Downland Living Museum, which informs
about the former country life of the area and fascinates with a
Victorian classroom and a Tudor kitchen, the MINI Cooper S 5-door
rolls back to Midhurst, where there is the opportunity to rest from
the impressive journey and ponder H. G. Wells at the Swan Inn in
Chichester Road.

Incidentally, he was not the only prominent resident of the town. For
example, Sir Alec Guinness, the man with a thousand faces, and William
Henry Pratt – better known as Boris Karloff or even as Frankenstein’s
monster – also lived and died in Midhurst. You can’t have England
without a bit of horror.

Fuel consumption, CO2 emission figures and power consumption were
measured using the methods required according to Regulation VO (EC)
2007/715 as amended. They refer to vehicles on the automotive market
in Germany. For ranges, the NEDC figures take into account
differences in the selected wheel and tyre size, while the WLTP
figures take into account the effects of any optional equipment.

All figures are already calculated on the basis of the new WLTP
test cycle. NEDC values listed have been calculated back to the NEDC
measurement procedure where applicable. WLTP values are used as a
basis for the definition of taxes and other vehicle-related levies
that are (also) based on CO2 emissions and, where applicable, for
the purposes of vehicle-specific subsidies. Further information on
the WLTP and NEDC measurement procedures is also available at www.bmw.de/wltp.

For further details of the official fuel consumption figures and
official specific CO2 emissions of new cars, please refer to the
“Manual on the fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and power consumption
of new cars”, available at sales outlets, from Deutsche Automobil
Treuhand GmbH (DAT), Hellmuth-Hirth-Str. 1, 73760
Ostfildern-Scharnhausen and at https://www.dat.de/co2/.

In case of queries, please contact:

Corporate Communications

Julian Kisch, Press Spokesperson Product Communications MINI
Tel.: +49-89-382-38072
E-mail: julian.kisch@mini.com

Andreas Lampka, Head of Communications MINI
Tel.: +49-89-382-23662
E-mail: andreas.lampka@mini.com


Jennifer Treiber-Ruckenbrod, Head of Communications MINI and BMW Motorrad
Tel.: +49-89-382-35108
E-mail: jennifer.ruckenbrod@bmwgroup.com

The BMW Group

With its four brands BMW, MINI, Rolls-Royce and BMW Motorrad, the
BMW Group is the world’s leading premium manufacturer of automobiles
and motorcycles and also provides premium financial and mobility
services. The BMW Group production network comprises 31 production
and assembly facilities in 15 countries; the company has a global
sales network in more than 140 countries.

In 2020, the BMW Group sold over 2.3 million passenger vehicles
and more than 169,000 motorcycles worldwide. The profit before tax
in the financial year 2020 was € 5.222 billion on revenues amounting
to € 98.990 billion. As of 31 December 2020, the BMW Group had a
workforce of 120,726 employees.

The success of the BMW Group has always been based on long-term
thinking and responsible action. The company set the course for the
future at an early stage and consistently makes sustainability and
efficient resource management central to its strategic direction,
from the supply chain through production to the end of the use phase
of all products.
www.bmwgroup.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/BMWGroup
Twitter: http://twitter.com/BMWGroup
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/BMWGroupView
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bmwgroup

Original Press Release

Paving the way for sustainable mobility: bp, BMW Group and Daimler Mobility announce successful closing of transaction that makes bp third shareholder of Digital Charging Solutions GmbH (DCS)

BMW:Paving the way for sustainable mobility: bp, BMW Group and Daimler Mobility announce successful closing of transaction that makes bp third shareholder of Digital Charging Solutions GmbH (DCS)

  • DCS offers industry leading solutions to provide EV drivers with
    seamless access to more than 300,000 charging points in 30
    countries.
  • bp will provide DCS customers access to an additional 9,000
    charging points across Europe including ultra-fast charging and
    together with DCS, will develop new integrated offers for fleets –
    including fuel and charge services
  • Globally, bp aims to grow its network of public EV charging
    points by 2030 to over 70,000 worldwide

 

London/Munich/Stuttgart. bp has become the third
shareholder of Digital Charging Solutions GmbH (DCS) following the
successful closing of the M&A transaction. bp gained a 33.3% stake
as part of a capital increase. BMW Group and Daimler Mobility AG
remain shareholders owning a 33.3% stake each.

Electrification is at the heart of bp’s approach to mobility. All
three shareholders of DCS share an ambition to drive electrification
forward and pave the way for sustainable mobility.  bp is rapidly
growing its charging businesses around the world and aims to have over
70,000 public charge points by 2030.

DCS’s services are essential for the electrification strategies of
the automotive industry. The company works with premium and high
volume OEMs to integrate its charging solutions into the vehicles’
operating systems and the OEMs’ digital ecosystems. Digital Charging
Solutions GmbH stands behind the CHARGE NOW brand in the YOUR NOW
Joint Ventures of BMW Group and Daimler Mobility AG and operates
charging services such as “Mercedes me Charge”, “BMW Charging” and
“MINI Charging”.

DCS already provides unrivaled access to charging infrastructure with
a coverage of more than 85% in 29 European countries.

Following the successful transaction, EV drivers can look forward to
enhanced coverage and charging convenience as they gain access to an
additional 9,000 rapid and ultra-fast charging points (more than
150kw) through bp’s European charging network – Aral Pulse in Germany
and bp pulse in the UK. Both bp and DCS will provide access to
advanced charging services such as Plug & Charge which enables a
seamless charging experience reducing the need for apps or charging
cards – initially available on Aral Pulse ultra-fast chargers in
Germany from Q1 2022.  

And to support the transition of businesses and fleets to electric
mobility, business customers can expect access to a 360° solution for
electric and hybrid fleets that includes new and innovative charging
services beyond fueling, tolling and washing offers.

Richard Bartlett, bp senior vice president, future mobility &
solutions said: “Our aim is to make charging as convenient as
refuelling at the pump – fast, reliable and highly integrated with the
vehicle operating system to provide a great customer experience. We’re
excited to have completed this transaction and look forward to working
with our partners to continue to provide EV drivers with access to
convenient charging where they need it.”

„We are pleased to welcome bp as a strong partner who shares our
vision to push electrification. By forming this strategic
collaboration with one of the biggest energy companies in the world,
we will provide drivers with increasing access to a convenient and
seamless charging ecosystem wherever and whenever they need it,
contributing to the electric transformation of our society”,”
said Gero Götzenberger, Director for Strategy and Digital Mobility
Solutions, Daimler Mobility AG.

“This collaboration brings our leading charging network a huge step
forward. Especially the electrification of fleets and fleet management
will see a comprehensive boost – we will jointly drive innovation,
increase our customer focus and accelerate CO2 reduction.
We welcome bp as a strong and progressive partner”, adds Rainer
Feurer, Senior Vice President of Investments at the BMW Group. 

Jörg Reimann, CEO Digital Charging Solutions GmbH: “We are really
excited to have bp as strategic partner and shareholder at the same
time. Our business models are highly complementary. We provide access
to the largest network of charging points in Europe – now we are
designing and delivering superior services for our current and future customers.”

 

 

 

Contacts

Daimler Mobility AG:
Michael Kuhn, +49 160 861 4768, michael.m.kuhn@daimler.com

BMW Group:
Dr. Britta Ullrich, +49 151 601 18 364, britta.ullrich@bmw.de

bp:

bp press office London, bppress@bp.com Switchboard: +44 (0)
207-496-4000; Tel: +44 (0) 207-496-4076 or +44 7919 217511

Digital Charging Solutions GmbH:
Meret Ginten, +49 160 967 488
79, meret.ginten@digitalchargingsolutions.com

Further information from Daimler is available at:

www.media.daimler.com and www.daimler.com

This document contains forward-looking statements that reflect our
current views about future events. The words “anticipate,” “assume,”
“believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” ”can,” “could,”
“plan,” “project,” “should” and similar expressions are used to
identify forward-looking statements. These statements are subject to
many risks and uncertainties, including an adverse development of
global economic conditions, in particular a decline of demand in our
most important markets; a deterioration of our refinancing
possibilities on the credit and financial markets; events of force
majeure including natural disasters, pandemics, acts of terrorism,
political unrest, armed conflicts, industrial accidents and their
effects on our sales, purchasing, production or financial services
activities; changes in currency exchange rates and tariff regulations;
a shift in consumer preferences towards smaller, lower-margin
vehicles; a possible lack of acceptance of our products or services
which limits our ability to achieve prices and adequately utilize our
production capacities; price increases for fuel or raw materials;
disruption of production due to shortages of materials, labor strikes
or supplier insolvencies; a decline in resale prices of used vehicles;
the effective implementation of cost-reduction and
efficiency-optimization measures; the business outlook for companies
in which we hold a significant equity interest; the successful
implementation of strategic cooperations and joint ventures; changes
in laws, regulations and government policies, particularly those
relating to vehicle emissions, fuel economy and safety; the resolution
of pending government investigations or of investigations requested by
governments and the conclusion of pending or threatened future legal
proceedings; and other risks and uncertainties, some of which we
describe under the heading “Risk and Opportunity Report” in the
current Annual Report or the current Interim Report. If any of these
risks and uncertainties materializes or if the assumptions underlying
any of our forward-looking statements prove to be incorrect, the
actual results may be materially different from those we express or
imply by such statements. We do not intend or assume any obligation to
update these forward-looking statements since they are based solely on
the circumstances at the date of publication.

Daimler Mobility at a Glance
In addition to
Mercedes-Benz AG and Daimler Truck AG, Daimler Mobility AG is one of
the three business divisions of Daimler AG. It has about 11,650
employees and specializes in financial and mobility solutions. Its
products range from leasing, financing, and insurance products to
innovative fleet management systems and app-based mobility services.
As a financial services provider, the business division supports the
sales of the Daimler Group’s automotive brands worldwide. In Germany,
Mercedes-Benz Bank AG, part of the Daimler Mobility division, is one
of the country’s leading automotive banks. It provides around one
million customers with financial leeway as well as call-money and
fixed-interest-rate accounts in the direct banking business. The
product range is supplemented by flexible mobility services such as
Mercedes-Benz Rent and EQ subscriptions, which enable an uncomplicated
and flexible entry into electro mobility. Through its subsidiary
Athlon, Daimler Mobility is represented in the commercial fleet
management segment as well as in vehicle leasing in Europe. The
company manages more than 400,000 vehicles in total. As a strategic
investor, Daimler Mobility also participates in the business potential
of digital mobility solutions through its holdings. The focus is on
its involvement in the YOUR NOW joint ventures, which are grouped into
three pillars: FREE NOW & REACH NOW, SHARE NOW, and PARK NOW &
CHARGE NOW. These pillars combine ride-hailing, carsharing, and
parking services with multimodal platforms and the charging of
electric vehicles. Daimler Mobility’s portfolio also contains holdings
in the limousine ride-hailing service StarRides in China and the
chauffeur and concierge service provider Blacklane. In 2020, Daimler
Mobility financed or leased around 50 percent of the vehicles sold by
Daimler worldwide. This corresponds to a contract volume of €150.6
billion. In 2020, the business division generated revenue of €27.7
billion and achieved EBIT of €1.4 billion. Daimler Mobility operates
in 39 countries.
www.daimler-mobility.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/daimler-mobility/mycompany/

twitter: https://twitter.com/MobilityDaimler

 

BMW Group
With its four brands BMW, MINI,
Rolls-Royce and BMW Motorrad, the BMW Group is the world’s leading
premium manufacturer of automobiles and motorcycles and also provides
premium financial and mobility services. The BMW Group production
network comprises 31 production and assembly facilities in 15
countries; the company has a global sales network in more than 140
countries.
In 2020, the BMW Group sold over 2.3 million
passenger vehicles and more than 169,000 motorcycles worldwide. The
profit before tax in the financial year 2020 was € 5.222 billion on
revenues amounting to € 98.990 billion. As of 31 December 2020, the
BMW Group had a workforce of 120,726 employees.
The success of
the BMW Group has always been based on long-term thinking and
responsible action. The company set the course for the future at an
early stage and consistently makes sustainability and efficient
resource management central to its strategic direction, from the
supply chain through production to the end of the use phase of all
products.
www.bmwgroup.com
Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/BMWGroup
Twitter:
http://twitter.com/BMWGroup
YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/BMWGroupView
Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/bmwgroup
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/bmw-group/

bp

bp’s purpose is to reimagine energy for people and our planet. It has
set out an ambition ‎to be a net zero company by 2050, or sooner and
help the world get to net zero, and a ‎strategy for delivering on that
ambition. Electrification is at the heart of bp’s convenience and
mobility strategy and the company aims to grow its network of public
EV charging points by 2030 to over 70,000 worldwide. They currently
have around 9,000 charging points in Europe and its UK network bp
pulse is already the most used EV charging network in the UK. The
company is also rapidly growing its network of ultra-fast chargers and
plans to have around 250 ultra-fast chargers operating at bp retail
sites in the UK and 500 ultra-fast charging points across its Aral
retail sites in Germany by year end.. Its customer and products
division has over 20,000 branded retail sites in 21 countries and more
than 11.5 million customer touchpoints per day. For more information
visit bp.com.‎

About Digital Charging Solutions GmbH

Digital Charging Solutions GmbH (DCS) develops charging solutions for
automobile manufacturers and fleet operators, making it one of the
world’s most important drivers of the transition to electromobility.
The full-service white label solutions of DCS allow OEMs and fleet
operators to realize their electromobility strategies, because with
integrated digital solutions, the company makes charging at charging
stations easy, safe and comfortable. With  more than 300,000 charging
points in 30 markets and cross-border charging, Digital Charging
Solutions GmbH offers access to the largest charging network in
Europe. Since the beginning of 2019, Digital Charging Solutions GmbH
has been part of the mobility joint venture between the BMW Group and
Daimler AG. CHARGE NOW is a brand of DCS and part of this joint
venture, which aims to strengthen sustainable mobility worldwide
together with the other verticals FREE NOW, SHARE NOW and REACH NOW.

Original Press Release

Shortlist exhibition of the Preis der Nationalgalerie 2021. BMW as long-term partner since 2006.

BMW:Shortlist exhibition of the Preis der Nationalgalerie 2021. BMW as long-term partner since 2006.

Munich/Berlin. From September 16, 2021 to
February 27, 2022
works of the nominees of the Preis der
Nationalgalerie 2021 Lamin Fofana, Calla
Henkel & Max Pitegoff
, Sandra Mujinga,
and Sung Tieu will be on display for a joint
exhibition at the Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin.
The BMW Group Cultural Engagement which celebrates its 50th
anniversary this year, already supports the Preis der Nationalgalerie
for 15 years now.

Deploying installation, photography, sculpture, sound, and other
media, the shortlist exhibition address topics such as displacement
and migration, belonging and alienation, shifting logics of public and
private space, and the potential of sound and music to act as social
forces. On display of the exhibition are both, already existing works
as well as new productions of the artists.

On the evening of October 7, 2021, an international
jury will announce the winner of the Preis der Nationalgalerie 2021.
The museum prize will be awarded already for the eleventh time by the
Nationalgalerie Berlin. It consists of a solo exhibition at Hamburger
Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin in the course of 2022 and an
accompanying publication.

The jury consists of:
Emre Baykal, Chief Curator, Arter, Istanbul
Sven Beckstette, Curator, Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum
für Gegenwart – Berlin
Gabriele Knapstein, Head of Hamburger Bahnhof –
Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin
Emma Lavigne, President, Palais de Tokyo, Paris
Yesomi Umolu, Director of Curatorial Affairs and
Public Practice, Serpentine, London  

The Preis der Nationalgalerie is made possible by the Freunde der
Nationalgalerie since the year 2000 and supported by BMW as exclusive
partner for 15 years now. The award focuses on young important
positions of today. Eligible are artists of all nationalities who at
the time of their nomination live and work in Germany and are under
the age of 40. Previous awardees amongst others were Monica Bonvicini
(2005), Cyprien Gaillard (2011), Anne Imhof (2015), Agnieszka Polska
(2017), and Pauline Curnier Jardin (2019).

For further information and image material, please visit www.preisdernationalgalerie.de
or www.smb.museum

 

For further questions please contact:
Prof. Dr
Thomas Girst
BMW Group Corporate and Governmental Affairs

Head of Cultural Engagement
Telephone: +49 89 382 247
53
Email: Thomas.Girst@bmwgroup.com

www.press.bmwgroup.com
Email:
presse@bmw.de

Fiona Geuss
Staatliche Museen zu Berlin
Preußischer
Kulturbesitz
Press Officer Nationalgalerie
Telephone: +49 30
3978 34 17
Email: presse@smb.spk-berlin.de 

www.smb.museum/presse

 

About the artists and their works on display at the shortlist
exhibition

Preis der Nationalgalerie 2021

Lamin Fofana (lives in Berlin and New
York)
Lamin Fofana explores questions of movement, migration,
alienation and belonging through his electronic music and in
installations. He synthesizes original composition, field recordings
and archival material to create sounds which place historical and
contemporary Black critical thought in a dialogue with the reality of
the world around us, and which open up new spaces for reflection
beyond this reality. For Preis der Nationalgalerie 2021, Fofana is
presenting the sound installations “BLUES” (2020) and “Ballad Air
& Fire” (2021), in which he incorporates light and scents as well
as videos and photography by his long-term collaborators Nicolas
Premier and Jim C. Nedd. In the installations, Fofana engages with key
texts dealing with the experiences of African people living in the
West–including works by Sylvia Wynter, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Amiri
Baraka–to create a multisensory space that fosters an active and
collective practice of listening.

Calla Henkel & Max Pitegoff (born 1988 in
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA / 1987 in Buffalo, New York, USA; both
live in Berlin)
Over the past ten years, Calla Henkel and Max
Pitegoff have developed a practice rooted in documentary photography
which has captured the socio-urban development of Berlin from their
perspective within the city’s artistic community. Their spaces Times
Bar, New Theater and, currently, their TV Bar have shaped the Berlin
art scene of recent years. In the photographic series “Exteriors”
(2021) and “Collective Image (Klärwerk Ruhleben)” (2021), the duo
examines utopian projections and underlying realities in order to
offer a view on urban development in Berlin and the unseen, peripheral
moments of city living. In addition, they are presenting a trailer for
“Paradise” (since 2020), an ongoing television series filmed at TV
Bar. The first two episodes of the series will be shown parallel to
the exhibition in bars and independent spaces around the city,
including Bierhaus Urban, Hopscotch Reading Room, Eschschloraque, and
Restaurant im Hamburger Bahnhof.

Sandra Mujinga (born 1989 in Goma, Democratic
Republic of the Congo; lives in Berlin and Oslo)
In her work,
Sandra Mujinga negotiates economies of visibility and invisibility,
and questions around identity, self-representation and surveillance.
The notion of camouflage and invisibility as a survival strategy plays
a crucial role in her observations of existing socio-political
structures and power dynamics. She navigates both physical and digital
spaces to create images and spatial configuration for speculative
worlds which look beyond an anthropocentric paradigm. In the
exhibition, Mujinga is presenting two new sculptural ensembles:
“Reworlding Remains” (2021) and “Sentinels of Change” (2021). Engaging
with principles of Afrofuturism and science fiction, and theories of
the posthuman, Mujinga deploys the strategy of worldbuilding in the
creation of fantastic figures and a schematic representation of a
dinosaur’s body bathed in green light.

Sung Tieus (born 1987 in Hau Duong, Vietnam; lives in
Berlin)
Life in the diaspora and its psychological consequences,
as well as the legacy of the Cold War and its lasting effects on
global capitalism are all recurring themes in the work of Sung Tieu
(born 1987 in Hai Duong, Vietnam, lives in Berlin). In her works she
often interlinks fact and fiction, historical and biographical events,
and a diverse array of lived social experiences. The installation
“Song for VEB Stern-Radio Berlin” (2021) draws on her interest in the
history of Vietnamese contract workers in the GDR. By incorporating
radios manufactured by contract workers in Berlin, Tieu’s installation
alludes directly to the city and its Vietnamese community. The radios
activate the space acoustically and create a dense weave of
readymades, texts and sound that give occasion to think about the
relationship between work and life, and between individuals and systems.

Original Press Release

BMW M Motorsport News, 7th September 2021.

BMW:BMW M Motorsport News, 7th September 2021.

DTM: Pole position and podium for Marco Wittmann in Spielberg.

Walkenhorst Motorsport driver Marco Wittmann (GER) continued his
impressive run at the fifth race weekend of the DTM season. He has
picked up points in each of the ten races so far. Wittmann was the
best-placed BMW driver in the Saturday race at the Red Bull Ring
(AUT), finishing seventh. He started Sunday in sparkling form,
securing pole position in the #11 BMW M6 GT3. In the race, he was
embroiled in a compelling battle with Ferrari driver Liam Lawson
(NZL), behind whom he ultimately finished in second place. Following
his third podium of the season, Wittmann now lies fourth in the
Drivers’ Championship with 121 points, 26 points off the lead.

Wittmann: “The start from pole was very good at first. We were
immediately able to open up a gap between Liam Lawson and the rest of
the field. We basically had good pace in the race too. In the end, we
lost first place in the pit stops, which is a big talking point this
season. Nevertheless, we scored more valuable points towards the
championship today.” Wittmann was referring to the fact that a number
of manufacturers have an advantage during the tyre change this season,
as the wheel nuts on their cars are fastened directly to the rims,
saving time. However, this type of attachment is not possible on some
of the cars, including the BMW M6 GT3.

Timo Glock (GER) twice finished tenth to score points for ROWE Racing
in Spielberg. Sheldon van der Linde (RSA) was very unlucky on both
days. After excellent qualifying results, with fourth on Saturday and
third on Sunday, he failed to finish both races.

DTM Trophy: One-two-three for the BMW M4 GT4.

The BMW M Motorsport teams celebrated a one-two-three in the DTM
Trophy at the Red Bull Ring (AUT) and claimed five of a possible six
podium places over the course of the two race days. Victory in
Saturday’s race went to Ben Green (GBR) in the FK Performance BMW M4
GT4, ahead of his team-mate Yann Zimmer (SUI) and Theo Oeverhaus (GER)
in a Walkenhorst Motorsport-run BMW M4 GT4. A total of six BMW drivers
made it into the top ten. On Sunday, five BMW M4 GT4 finished in the
points – two of them on the podium. That time, Michael Schrey (GER)
came home second in the Hofor Racing by Bonk Motorsport car. He was
followed over the finish line in third place by Green, whose second
podium of the weekend was sufficient to regain the lead in the
Drivers’ Championship. With 148 points, he now leads Sunday’s winner
William Tregurtha (USA, Mercedes) by ten points. Schrey is third with
110 points and still within striking distance.

BMW M2 Cup: Double success for Oeverhaus.

Theo Oeverhaus (GER) not only made it onto the podium in the DTM
Trophy at the Red Bull Ring (AUT), but also dominated both races in
the BMW M2 Cup. The 16-year-old secured pole position for both races
at the wheel of his BMW M2 CS Racing. After good starts in both races,
he went on to take commanding victories. In doing so, he was seemingly
unaffected by the turbulent racing going on behind him, which featured
some remarkable battles. “It was a dream weekend. Two wins, two poles
– just perfect,” said a delighted Oeverhaus. “I barely noticed all the
turmoil behind me. My re-starts after the safety car were really good.
I was immediately able to open a gap and stay clear of it all.” Second
and third place on Saturday went to Colin Caresani (NED) and Louis
Henkefend (GER). On Sunday, Henkefend finished runner-up behind
Oeverhaus and ahead of Nicolas Hancke (GER). In doing so, he extended
his overall lead. Now with 133 points to his name, he only has a
five-point lead over Fabian Kreim (GER), who finished fifth and fourth
in Spielberg. More information on the BMW M2 Cup can be found on the
official website bmwm2cup.com.
Images and video material can be downloaded here in the ‘Media’
section.  

GTWC: 3-hour race at the Nürburgring.

The scheduling clash with the DTM meant Walkenhorst Motorsport had to
field a different driver line-up in race four of this season’s Fanatec
GT World Challenge Endurance Cup at the Nürburgring (GER) at the
weekend. In the #34 BMW M6 GT3, regular driver David Pittard and his
new team-mates Jake Dennis and Nick Yelloly (all GBR) ended the
three-hour race in 12th place. Pittard had previously
finished runner-up in the Pro category in the Fanatec Esports GT Pro
Series on Saturday, scoring valuable points for Walkenhorst Motorsport
in the Team competition. Regular drivers Martin Tomczyk (GER) and
Thomas Neubauer (FRA) were joined by Nick Catsburg (NED) in the #35
BMW M6 GT3, and the trio finished the race in 15th place.
Boutsen Ginion Racing and its drivers Jens Klingmann (GER), Karim
Ojjeh (KSA) and Jens Liebhauser (GER) struggled with technical issues
in the race. They eventually came home 12th in the Pro-Am class.

GT4 European Series: Borusan Otomotiv Motorsport on the Pro-Am podium.

Borusan Otomotiv Motorsport made it onto the podium in the Pro-Am
class at the GT4 European Series event at the Nürburgring (GER).
Hansan Tansu and Yagiz Gedik (both TUR) finished second in their class
in the #11 BMW M4 GT4 on Saturday. Their team-mates Cem Bölükbasi and
Berkay Besler (both TUR) were seventh overall in the best-placed BMW
M4 GT4. Paolo Meloni (SMR) and Massimiliano Tresoldi (ITA) from the
W&D Racing Team finished fourth in the AM class, narrowly missing
out on a podium. The BMW M Motorsport teams did not produce any top
results in the Sunday race.

Italian GT: BMW Team Italia on the podium with the BMW M6 GT3.

Marius Zug (GER) and Stefano Comandini (ITA) impressed in both races
in the Italian GT Sprint Championship at Imola (ITA) and were rewarded
for their strong performances with a place on the podium. They came
home fourth on Saturday, narrowly missing out on a podium with the BMW
Team Italia BMW M6 GT3. However, they went one better on Sunday,
finishing third to secure their place on the podium. Their team-mates
Nicola Neri and Giuseppe Fascicolo (both ITA) were second in the
GT4-AM class in their BMW M4 GT4 on Saturday, but failed to finish the
Sunday race.

BMW M2 CS Racing Cup Italy: Luigi Ferrara bags a brace at Imola.

The fourth race weekend in the BMW M2 CS Racing Cup Italy was all
about Luigi Ferrara (ITA). He won both races at Imola (ITA) and took a
big step towards the top of the overall standings. Now with 101 points
to his name, he trails the leader Gustavo Sandrucci (ITA) by just nine
points. Sandrucci finished runner-up behind Ferrara in the opening
race, but had to settle for sixth place in race two. Third place on
Saturday went to Lorenzo Marcucci (ITA), while Marco Zanasi and
Alessandro Brigatti (both ITA) joined Ferrara on the podium on Sunday.

24h Barcelona: ST Racing claims GT4 class victory.

The ST Racing team celebrated victory in the GT4 class at the 24-hour
race in Barcelona (ESP). After 638 laps of racing, Samantha Tan, Nick
Wittmer (both CAN), Chandler Hull and Jon Miller (both USA) came home
well ahead of their closest rivals to take the class win and finish an
impressive 12th overall. Daren Jorgensen, Brett Strom (both
USA), Nathan Freke (GBR) and Danny van Dongen (NED) from the RHC
Jorgensen-Strom by Century team finished runner-up in the GT4 class to
complete a one-two for the BMW M4 GT4.

GT World Challenge America: Victory for Turner Motorsport in
the BMW M6 GT3.

Robby Foley and Michael Dinan (both USA) claimed the first win of the
season for Turner Motorsport in race two of the Fanatec GT World
Challenge America at Road America (USA). After 41 laps of racing, the
duo in the #96 BMW M6 GT3 came home 4.6 seconds ahead of their closest
rivals. Foley and Dinan had previously finished seventh overall,
fourth in the Pro category, in the first race of the event, which took
place on the last weekend in August. They now lie fourth in the
Drivers’ Championship with 87 points.

GT4/GT/TC America: Victories and podiums aplenty for BMW teams.

BMW M Motorsport teams claimed many victories and podiums across
various series and classes at the Road America (USA) race weekend at
the end of August. The BMW M4 GT4 was in action in both the GT4
America and GT America series at the iconic circuit. Meanwhile, the
BMW M2 CS Racing and the BMW M240i Racing were out on track in TC America.

In GT4 America, the BMW M4 GT4 took five of the six places available
on the podium. In race one, it was James Walker and Bill Auberlen
(both USA) of the BimmerWorld Racing team who took victory, ahead of
Tom Capizzi and John Capresto-Dubets (both USA) of Auto Technic Racing
and the second BimmerWorld Racing duo of James Clay and Nick Galante
(both USA). Tim Barber and Cole Ciraulo (both USA) finished runner-up
in the Silver class for CCR Racing/Team TFB. The second race was won
by Sean Quinlan and Gregory Liefooghe (both USA) in the Stephen
Cameron Racing BMW M4 GT4, ahead of Capizzi and Capresto-Dubets, who
again finished runner-up. Harry Gottsacker and Tyler Maxson (both USA)
won the Silver class for ST Racing. In GT America, Quinlan took
victory in the GT4 class in both races as an individual starter for
Stephen Cameron Racing.

BMW M Motorsport achieved a top-five and a top-six lock out in TC
America. Jacob Ruud (USA) won race one in A BMW M2 CS Racing for
Classic BMW. He was followed home by a further three BMW M2 CS
Racings. Fifth place went to Austen Smith (USA) in a BMW M240i Racing
run by Auto Technic Racing. That earned Smith victory in the TC class.
In race two, no fewer than six BMW M2 CS Racings led the field home.
The race was won by Stephen Cugliari (USA) of Accelerating
Performance, ahead of Hard Motorsport drivers Ruud and Steve Streimer
(USA). This was the same trio that had celebrated on the podium after
the opening race – only in a different order. Smith finished third in
the TC class this time.

BTCC: A win and four podiums for BMW teams in Thruxton.

The last weekend in August saw the British Touring Car Championship
(BTCC) at Thruxton (GBR) for the second time this season. There was
more cause for celebration for those at the wheel of the BMW 330i M
Sport – particularly Adam Morgan (GBR), who took victory for the Car
Gods with Ciceley Motorsport team in the third and final race on
Sunday. He was followed home in second place by Colin Turkington
(GBR). The Team BMW driver had finished 12th and sixth in the first
two races and is the top BMW driver in the Drivers’ Championship in
fifth place. Morgan is just below him in the standings in sixth place.
He ended the first two races at Thruxton in seventh and eighth place.
Tom Oliphant (GBR) made two appearances on the podium, finishing third
for Team BMW in races one and two. He rounded the weekend off with
12th place in the third race. BMW continues to lead the
Manufacturers competition with 532 points.

Original Press Release

BMW M Motorsport News, 24th August 2021.

BMW:BMW M Motorsport News, 24th August 2021.

DTM: Marco Wittmann enjoys more success in the BMW M6 GT3 at
the Nürburgring.

Two weeks after taking victory at Zolder (BEL), Walkenhorst
Motorsport again had cause for celebration at round four of this
season’s DTM at the Nürburgring (GER): Marco Wittmann (GER), in the
#11 BMW M6 GT3, finished third in race two to claim another podium.
Wittmann had previously secured a promising third place on the grid in
Saturday’s qualifying for race one. However, the team knew that it
would be tough to achieve a podium finish, due to the extra 25
kilograms he was carrying following the victory at Zolder. At the end
of the 40-lap race, Wittmann crossed the finish line in fifth place.

In a wet qualifying for race two on Sunday, the two-time DTM champion
again put the #11 BMW M6 GT3 third on the grid. The safety car then
made two appearances in an eventful race. As Walkenhorst Motorsport
had already come in for an early pit stop, Wittmann had to fight his
way back past those drivers that had not yet stopped at the restarts.
He did so superbly and ultimately came home in third place to secure
the final spot on the podium. “That was one of the most eventful races
of my DTM career,” said Wittmann. “The second restart was particularly
chaotic. We were five cars side-by-side coming into the first corner,
and I just hoped that I would somehow get through in one piece. I
passed five or six cars within just a few corners. It could easily
have gone wrong, but it worked out and I had a lot of fun.” Wittmann
now lies third in the Drivers’ Championship.

The ROWE Racing team had a mixed weekend. Sheldon van der Linde (RSA)
fought back from 18th on the grid to finish sixth in the #31 BMW M6
GT3 in Saturday’s race. In the Sunday race, the South African was in
with a shout of a podium finish until his BMW M6 GT3 was hit by
another car at the second restart. The result was a broken steering,
which forced van der Linde out of the race. His team-mate Timo Glock
(GER) had to settle for 19th place in the Saturday race. However, the
tide turned on Sunday when Glock, in the #16 BMW M6 GT3, worked his
way from 20th on the grid to eighth place. In doing so, he scored his
first points of the DTM season. After the race, he was promoted to
seventh place following a penalty handed to one of his rivals.

DTM Trophy: One-two for the BMW M4 GT4 in the Eifel mountains.

BMW M Motorsport teams in the DTM Trophy once again impressed with a
strong display at the Nürburgring (GER). Saturday’s race produced a
one-two for the BMW M4 GT4. The dominant driver was Ben Green (GBR) in
the #10 BMW M4 GT4 of FK Performance Motorsport. Starting from pole,
Green took a comfortable lights-to-flag victory. Michael Schrey (GER)
followed him home in second place, in the #2 BMW M4 GT4 of Hofor
Racing by Bonk Motorsport, to make it a BMW one-two.

Schrey finished fourth in the Sunday race, but was then handed a
five-second penalty which saw him relegated to eighth place. The
best-placed BMW driver was Yann Zimmer (SUI) in the #50 BMW M4 GT4,
who finished sixth for FK Performance Motorsport. His team-mate Green
finished just behind him in seventh, ahead of Schrey. Green and Schrey
lie second and third in the Drivers’ Championship. Green trails the
current leader by just three points.

BMW M2 Cup: Exciting battle for the championship lead.

The new BMW M2 Cup was also at the Nürburgring (GER) at the weekend
for its third event of the season. An exciting battle for the
championship lead developed over the course of two thrilling races on
Saturday and Sunday.

In Saturday’s opening race, Louis Henkefend (GER) took a comfortable
second win of the season in the #17 BMW M2 CS Racing. He crossed the
finish line almost six seconds clear of his closest rival. In doing
so, Henkefend extended his championship lead – briefly. “That was a
perfect race,” said Henkefend afterwards. “I grabbed the lead in turn
one and then had a clear track in front of me. I am really happy, as I
have scored valuable points in the championship.” Behind him, Fabian
Kreim (GER / #43) and Nicolas Hancke (GER / #99) were embroiled in a
hard-fought battle for second place. Kreim had the upper hand for a
long time, but it was Hancke who eventually prevailed and took second
place. As such, the podium featured Henkefend, Hancke and Kreim.

Race two on Sunday was another thriller with the drivers in the BMW
M2 CS Racing cars making a host of spectacular manoeuvres on a dry
track. This time, it was Hancke who added victory to the second place
he recorded on Saturday. “It has been a long road onto the podium. I
was lacking a bit of pace in the first few races, but it was better
here at the Nürburgring. I am incredibly happy with the result,” said
the #99 BMW M2 CS Racing driver. Second place went to Kreim, with
Davit Kajaia (GEO / #5) taking third. Henkefend had to settle for
sixth place after receiving a penalty for failing to observe track limits.

That result saw the championship lead change hands and Kreim is the
new leader with 97 points. Henkefend is now second with 95 points,
followed in third place by Hancke (76 points). The BMW Junior Team
visited the BMW M2 Cup paddock at the Nürburgring weekend. Dan Harper
(GBR), Neil Verhagen (USA) and Max Hesse (GER) called upon their
experience to give the drivers some valuable tips. More information on
the BMW M2 Cup is available on the official website: bmwm2cup.com.
There, you will find images and videos to download in the ‘Media’ section.

GTWC: New driver pairings for Walkenhorst Motorsport.

Walkenhorst Motorsport will compete with three established drivers
and three new drivers in the cockpits of the two BMW M6 GT3 in the
remaining two races of the season in the Endurance Cup, within the
FANATEC GT World Challenge Europe, at the Nürburgring (GER, 5th
September) and Barcelona (ESP, 10th October). Jake Dennis (GR) will
make his GT debut for BMW M Motorsport alongside regular driver David
Pittard (GBR) in the #34 car. Just a few days ago, he ended his rookie
season in the ABB FIA Formula E World Championship with BMW i Andretti
Motorsport in third place in the overall standings. The third driver
in the all-British line-up will be Nick Yelloly (GBR). At the wheel of
the #35 BMW M6 GT3, regular drivers Martin Tomczyk (GER) and Thomas
Neubauer (FRA) will be ably assisted by Nick Catsburg (NED). Catsburg
and Yelloly not only won the 2020 Nürburgring 24 Hours together in a
BMW M6 GT3, but also raced for Walkenhorst Motorsport in the
Intercontinental GT Challenge so know the team very well. The change
in the driver line-up is due to a schedule clash with the DTM, in
which Marco Wittmann (GER) is driving for Walkenhorst Motorsport on
the same weekends, while Sheldon van der Linde (RSA) and Timo Glock
(GER) compete for ROWE Racing.

Super GT Championship: BMW Team Studie in action at Suzuka.

BMW Team Studie was back in action in the Japanese Super GT
Championship last weekend – this time at Suzuka (JPN). The
300-kilometre race was originally scheduled for the end of May, but
had to be postponed to August due to the coronavirus. The #7 BMW M6
GT3 of BMW Team Studie was once again driven by Seiji Ara and Tomohide
Yamaguchi (both JPN). In Saturday’s qualifying session, the duo was
14th fastest. However, in Sunday’s race, which took place under cloudy
skies and in temperatures of about 30 degrees, the #7 dropped back
through the field as the result of a drive-through penalty. In the
end, Ara/Yamaguchi came home in 25th place.

GT4 Scandinavia: Second event of the season at Gelleråsen.

GT4 Scandinavia staged its second event of the season last weekend.
This time, Gelleråsen Arena (SWE) hosted the two races. Flying the
flag for BMW was the 996 Lestrup Racing Team with the #98 BMW M4 GT4.
Alternating at the wheel were Joakim Walde and Victor Bouveng (both
SWE). The duo had previously taken victory and claimed another podium
result in the Pro-Am class at the season-opener at Fällfors (SWE) in
June. At Gelleråsen, Walde/Bouveng finished fourth, narrowly missing
out on another podium. They were then unfortunate and failed to finish
in race two on Sunday.

BTCC: Milestone victory for Colin Turkington at Knockhill.

Colin Turkington (GBR) reached a milestone at round five of the
British Touring Car Championship (BTCC) at Knockhill (GR) in
mid-August. In the first of the three races, Turkington took a
comfortable victory in the #2 BMW 330i M Sport run by Team BMW – this
was the team’s 100th victory in the BTCC and the 75th time they had
celebrated together with BMW. Turkington then finished runner-up in
race two. His team-mate Stephen Jelley (GBR) stepped onto the podium
after race three, having finished third in the #12 BMW 330i M Sport.
Turkington ended the third and final race of the weekend in eighth
place. After five race weekends, BMW tops the Manufacturer standings
with 439 points and a lead of 55 over its closest rivals.

Original Press Release

Where numbers count: In the MINI Cooper SE Countryman ALL4 through the banking capital Frankfurt.

BMW:Where numbers count: In the MINI Cooper SE Countryman ALL4 through the banking capital Frankfurt.

Munich. Anyone approaching the banking metropolis of
Frankfurt am Main on the Autobahn 5 from the north will see it from
afar: the skyline of skyscraper towers where, among others, the major
financial institutions have set up their headquarters. No other city
in Germany welcomes its visitors with a comparable panorama. Frankfurt
is not only the seat of the German Stock Exchange and the European
Central Bank, but also home to the four largest national financial
institutions. The city where the heart of finance beats has a long
tradition as a trading centre and trade fair location. Frankfurt has
always paid close attention to figures. So it is fitting that the MINI
Cooper SE Countryman ALL4 (fuel consumption combined: 2.1 – 1.7 l/100
km according to WLTP, 2.1 – 1.9 l/100 km according to NEDC;
electricity consumption combined: 15.5 – 14.8 kWh/100 km according to
WLTP, 14.8 – 14.1 kWh/100 km according to NEDC, CO2 emissions
combined: 47 – 39 g/km according to WLTP, 48 – 44 g/km according to
NEDC) can score points on the test drive through the urban area and
the neighbouring regions not only with driving pleasure typical of the
brand, but also with tangible data.

Four doors, five full seats, two engines and four driven wheels –
these are the elementary figures from which both the versatility and
agile handling as well as the high efficiency of MINI’s first plug-in
hybrid model can be derived. In detail, this means: a three-cylinder
petrol engine with 92 kW/125 hp from a displacement of 1.5 litres
drives the front wheels, while a 70 kW/95 hp electric motor transmits
its power to the rear wheels. This results in a system output of 162
kW/220 hp and a hybrid-specific all-wheel drive. The precisely
controlled interaction of the two motors optimises the vehicle’s
tracking ability in the city and its sporty cornering performance on
country roads, as well as its traction on slippery roads and unpaved terrain.

In city traffic, the MINI Cooper SE Countryman ALL4 can be driven
purely electrically. On the drive through the canyons of office
towers, to which the city owes its nickname “Mainhattan”, it
thus becomes a pioneer for sustainable mobility. Almost the entire
inner city area of Frankfurt is designated as an environmental zone.
Thanks to the Euro 6d emissions standard, the MINI Cooper SE
Countryman ALL4 is likely to start its combustion engine there, but in
local emission-free driving mode it immediately sets an example for
clean driving pleasure.

An important argument for calculators who are as cool as they are
environmentally conscious: anyone who drives to their place of work in
the city every day from their home in the surrounding countryside can
easily do this too in purely electric mode with the MINI Cooper SE
Countryman ALL4. The right figures to go with it: The electricity that
powers the electric motor is stored in a high-voltage battery with a
gross energy content of 10.0 kWh. This gives a combined electric range
of 44 to 51 kilometres. And electric commuting not only significantly
reduces energy costs. Using the MINI Cooper SE Countryman ALL4 as a
company car also comes with a rebate from the tax office. For the
plug-in hybrid model, only half of the otherwise usual imputed income
has to be taxed.

This spares the budget for shopping trips. In Frankfurt’s city
centre, visitors have a choice between luxury boutiques and the
branches of large fashion chains, especially in Goethestraße and on
the shopping mile Zeil. Those who want to eat something in between
will find something nearby on Grosse Bockenheimer Strasse, which is
known to the locals as “Fressgass” for a reason.

One of the special features of Frankfurt’s cityscape is the
juxtaposition of the hypermodern glass and steel facades of modern
office complexes with historic buildings. No fewer than 17 buildings
reach the status of skyscraper with a height of at least 150 metres.
The old town, on the other hand, impresses with other values. The
Römer, the city’s magnificent town hall, dates from the 15th century
and, like the Kaiserdom, the Paulskirche, where the first German
parliament met in 1848, the birthplace of the poet Johann Wolfgang
Goethe, and the more than 400-year-old Haus Wertheim with its original
half-timbering, is one of the sights that survived both the Second
World War and the building and modernisation boom of the post-war era.

While sightseeing, shopping or visiting the renowned Schirn
Kunsthalle on Römerberg, time flies. Meanwhile, the MINI Cooper SE
Countryman ALL4 can replenish its power reserves at one of the
numerous public charging stations in the city. After just two and a
half hours, the high-voltage battery has reached 80 per cent of its
total capacity again with an output of 3.7 kW.

This means the MINI Cooper SE Countryman ALL4 has enough energy for
an excursion into the green surroundings of the big city. In the west
of Frankfurt, the Taunus begins just beyond the city limits. A popular
local recreation area stretches between the Feldberg and the
Rhine-Main plain and can be reached quickly via the Frankfurt motorway
ring. In purely electric driving mode, the plug-in hybrid model
reaches a top speed of 135 km/h. If both engines are used together,
even 196 km/h are possible. In addition, 6.8 seconds are sufficient
for the sprint from standstill to 100 km/h.

On the winding country roads of the low mountain region, the MINI
Cooper SE Countryman ALL4 demonstrates its sporty talent particularly
clearly. On wet or dirty roads, the precisely coordinated power
distribution of the two engines ensures optimised driving stability.
Even when cornering at high speed, any tendency to over- or understeer
is prevented at the outset. And on the numerous inclines in the Taunus
region, the combined system torque of 385 Nm makes itself felt,
allowing the MINI Cooper SE Countryman ALL4 to tackle every uphill
passage with spirit.

If the excursion into the countryside is to be extended into a longer
journey, the MINI Cooper SE Countryman ALL4 is also a force to be
reckoned with. Its high-voltage battery is accommodated under the rear
seat bench to save space. This means that there are no comfort
restrictions on the three seats in the rear compared to the interior
in the conventionally powered model variants of the robust
all-rounder. The luggage compartment volume is also only slightly
smaller, ranging from 405 to 1,275 litres, so that you can be a little
more generous when packing your holiday wardrobe.

In case of queries, please contact:

Corporate Communications

Markus Bräuer, Press Spokesperson Product
Communication MINI
Tel.: +49-89-382-30327
E-mail: marus.br.braeuer@mini.com

Andreas Lampka, Head of Communication MINI
Tel.:
+49-89-382-23662
E-mail: andreas.lampka@mini.com

Jennifer Treiber-Ruckenbrod, Head of Communication MINI
and
BMW Motorrad
Tel.: +49-89-382-35108
E-mail: jennifer.ruckenbrod@bmwgroup.com

Fuel consumption, CO2 emission figures and power consumption were
measured using the methods required according to Regulation VO (EC)
2007/715 as amended. They refer to vehicles on the automotive market
in Germany. For ranges, the NEDC figures take into account
differences in the selected wheel and tyre size, while the WLTP
figures take into account the effects of any optional equipment.

All figures are already calculated on the basis of the new WLTP
test cycle. NEDC values listed have been calculated back to the NEDC
measurement procedure where applicable. WLTP values are used as a
basis for the definition of taxes and other vehicle-related levies
that are (also) based on CO2 emissions and, where applicable, for
the purposes of vehicle-specific subsidies. Further information on
the WLTP and NEDC measurement procedures is also available at www.bmw.de/wltp can be found.

For further details of the official fuel consumption figures and
official specific CO2 emissions of new cars, please refer to the
“Manual on the fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and power consumption
of new cars”, available at sales outlets, from Deutsche Automobil
Treuhand GmbH (DAT), Hellmuth-Hirth-Str. 1, 73760
Ostfildern-Scharnhausen and at https://www.dat.de/co2/.

The BMW Group

With its four brands BMW, MINI, Rolls-Royce and BMW Motorrad, the BMW
Group is the world’s leading premium manufacturer of automobiles and
motorcycles and also provides premium financial and mobility services.
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Original Press Release

The first-ever BMW i4.

BMW:The first-ever BMW i4.

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PressClub Global · Article.

The BMW i4 and BMW iX together mark the next major step in the BMW Group transformation towards a 50% global share of fully-electric vehicle sales in 2030. Therefore it is only logical that both vehicles are launching at the same time.  See here all details on the first-ever BMW i4.  For the BMW iX please refer to the separate communications today on BMW Group Pressclub

All numbers are preliminary.
Homologation figures are not yet available.

Deliveries will start in autumn 2021.

The first-ever BMW i4

  • All-electric mobility reaches the very heart of the BMW brand. The
    BMW i4 is the brand’s first electric vehicle focused squarely on
    driving dynamics. Locally emission-free driving pleasure,
    compromise-free premium quality and customer-oriented
    individualisation come to the traditional core of the midsize
    segment for the first time. The BMW i4 combines BMW’s fabled
    sporting prowess and a range that also convinces over long journeys
    with the elegant design, spaciousness and practicality of a
    four-door Gran Coupé.
  • Market launch gets underway in November 2021 with two
    model variants: BMW i4 M50 (electric power consumption combined:
    24 – 19 kWh/100 km [62 miles] in the WLTP cycle; CO2
    emissions of 0 g/km) – the first purely electric performance car
    from BMW M GmbH, with 400 kW/544 hp, all-wheel drive and a range of
    up to 510 kilometres (317 miles) in the WLTP cycle; BMW i4 eDrive40
    (electric power consumption combined: 20 – 16 kWh/100 km [62 miles]
    in the WLTP cycle; CO2 emissions von 0 g/km) with
    250 kW/340 hp, classical rear-wheel drive and a range of up to
    590 kilometres (367 miles) in the WLTP cycle.
  • Integrated application of all powertrain and chassis components,
    using decades of expertise build up by an established maker of
    exceptionally sporty premium cars, creates a degree of design
    coherence rivals cannot match. Familiar BMW dynamic driving
    abilities extending far beyond rapid acceleration in a straight line
    combine with sublime long-distance comfort.
  • Hallmark BMW solution to the clash between sportiness and
    long-distance ability: efficient drive system technology and
    intelligent lightweight design enable smile-inducing dynamics and a
    long range without the need for disproportionately large and heavy batteries.
  • The BMW i4 is based on a flexible vehicle architecture conceived
    from the outset for a purely electric drive system. Long wheelbase
    and wide tracks. Weight-minimised yet extremely stiff body
    structure. Model-specific torsion struts, aluminium shear panel and
    front axle subframe have fixed connection with the casing of the
    high-voltage battery. Optimised aerodynamics with Cd of 0.24.
  • Newly designed chassis technology attuned precisely to the vehicle
    concept uses a double-joint spring strut front axle and five-link
    rear axle. Lift-related dampers and rear-axle air suspension come as
    standard. Near-actuator wheel slip limitation (also teamed for the
    first time with electric all-wheel drive) delivers outstanding
    traction and directional stability in extremely dynamic driving
    manoeuvres. BMW i4 M50 also features model-specific adaptive M
    suspension, variable sport steering, M Sport braking system and
    optional M light-alloy wheels (up to 20-inch).
  • Fifth-generation BMW eDrive technology with highly integrated unit
    of electric motor, power electronics and transmission and the latest
    battery cell technology. Electric motors work according to the
    principle of an electrically excited synchronous unit. Power density
    of up to 2.14 kW/kg; instantaneous power delivery, sustained over
    a broad rev band.
  • BMW i4 M50 with Sport Boost for ultra-dynamic power delivery
    from the two electric motors with peak output and maximum system
    torque of 795 Nm (586 lb-ft). Acceleration of 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph)
    in 3.9 seconds. BMW i4 eDrive40 with maximum system torque of 430 Nm
    (317 lb-ft) and 0 – 100 km/h (62 mph) in 5.7 seconds.
  • Model-specific drive sound delivers authentic feedback to movement
    of the accelerator and speed. BMW i4 M50 with extremely
    energy-charged soundtrack. Optional BMW IconicSounds Electric
    enables integration of new sound variants created as part of a
    collaboration with film music composer Hans Zimmer.
  • Slim high-voltage battery specially designed for the BMW i4
    and positioned low down in the vehicle floor with extremely
    low cell height of 110 millimetres. Vehicle centre of gravity
    up to 53 millimetres lower than in the BMW 3 Series Sedan.
    Gross energy content: 83.9 kWh.
  • Adaptive or individually adjustable recuperation of braking energy
    increases efficiency and enables one-pedal feeling plus the use of
    the coasting function depending on need and the traffic situation.
  • Integral heating and cooling system with heat pump function for
    the interior, high-voltage battery and drive system. Anticipatory
    thermal management for the high-voltage battery optimises charging efficiency.
  • Combined Charging Unit allows use of DC fast-charging stations
    with output of up to 200 kW. Range can be increased by as much as
    164 kilometres / 102 miles (BMW i4 eDrive40) and 140 kilometres / 87
    miles (BMW i4 M50) within 10 minutes at stations of this kind. BMW
    Charging with special rates for public charging stations and IONITY
    high-power charging stations.
  • BMW i4 is new byword for sustainable sportiness, comfort and
    everyday usability in the premium midsize segment. Gran Coupé
    vehicle concept combines sedan-level ride comfort with modern
    functionality. Elegantly sporting design with stretched coupé
    proportions, a flowing roofline, four doors with frameless windows
    and a large tailgate.
  • Largely blanked-off front end and striking BMW kidney grille
    with discreetly integrated camera, ultrasonic and radar sensors.
    Slim headlights, optionally with BMW Laserlight. Colour accents
    in BMW i Blue. BMW i4 eDrive40 in M Sport specification and
    BMW i4 M50 with bespoke performance-led cues. M Carbon
    exterior package and M Performance Parts available from launch.
  • Luxurious premium ambience and variable-use interior space.
    Acoustic glazing, pre-heating and pre-conditioning, Sport seats
    and sports steering wheel as standard. Centre console with
    modern-design control panel for the gear selector lever, BMW
    Controller and function keys. Large tailgate comes as standard with
    electric opening and closing mechanism. Load compartment capacity of
    470 litres can be expanded up to a maximum 1,290 litres.
    Electrically extendable and retractable trailer tow hitch optional.
    Permissible trailer load: 1,600 kilograms.
  • Wide array of individualisation options as is typical of premium
    models. Driving pleasure and comfort enhanced by options such
    as seat heating and ventilation, Vernasca leather trim and
    BMW Individual leather trim variants, instrument panel in Sensatec
    and leather variants, M Sport package Pro, ambient lighting, Harman
    Kardon Surround Sound System and large glass slide/tilt sunroof.
  • Premiere for new generation BMW iDrive control/operation system.
    Clear focus on touchscreen functionality of the new BMW Curved
    Display and natural spoken dialogue using the extensively upgraded
    BMW Intelligent Personal Assistant. Fully digital screen grouping
    of 12.3-inch information display and 14.9-inch control display.
    Advanced graphics and powerful software based on BMW Operating System 8.
  • Automatic climate control with new control approach using
    touchscreen display and integrated nanofiber filter. Intelligently
    coordinated temperature control using airflow control, seat heating
    and steering wheel heating.
  • Remote Software Upgrades keep the software “always fresh”.
    Navigation with cloud-based BMW Maps system. Route planning
    including mid-journey stops for charging using Connected
    Charging. Extensive smartphone integration including use
    of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. Personalisation through
    BMW ID and My BMW App. Integration of personal mobile accounts into
    the car via Personal eSIM. Fast data transmission using 5G.
  • Around 40 driver assistance functions available. Front-collision
    warning, Speed Limit Info and Lane Departure Warning fitted as
    standard. Optional Active Cruise Control with automatic Speed Limit
    Assist, route monitoring function and (in Germany) reaction to
    traffic lights. Also available: Driving Assistant Professional
    including Steering and Lane Control Assistant.
  • Park Distance Control and Reversing Assist Camera fitted as
    standard. Optional Parking Assistant with Reversing Assistant.
    Parking Assistant Plus with functions including Surround View and
    Remote 3D View.
  • Clear focus on sustainability through responsible use of resources
    throughout the value chain and maximum reduction in CO2
    footprint across the full product lifecycle. Vehicle production at
    BMW Group Plant Munich; battery cells manufactured using 100-per
    cent green energy.
  • Extensive use of secondary raw materials, natural materials and
    recycled materials. Specific design principle for the electric
    motors allows the use of rare earth metals to be avoided.
    Controlled, transparent and sustainable extraction of cobalt and
    lithium for the high-voltage battery.

CO2 EMISSIONS & CONSUMPTION.

BMW i4 eDrive40*: Combined power consumption: 20 to 16 kWh/100km
WLTP; CO2 emissions combined: 0 g/km WLTP.

BMW i4 M50*: Combined power consumption: 24 to 19 kWh/100km WLTP; CO2
emissions combined: 0 g/km WLTP.
(* = preliminary data. No
homologation figures available yet.)

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BMW Group Streaming

OUR ALL-NEW FULLY ELECTRIC TRIO.

01 June 2021. Here you can see the webcast of the event “Our all-new fully electric trio: BMW iX, BMW i4 and the first fully electric BMW M”.

Open Streaming Page

CO2 emission information.

The following applies to consumption figures for vehicles with new type approval, September 2017 onward: The figures for fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and energy consumption are obtained in accordance with the specified measuring procedure (EC Regulation No. 715/2007), as issued and amended. The figures are for a basic-version vehicle in Germany. The bandwidths allow for differences in the choice of wheel and tire sizes and items of optional equipment and can be changed by the configuration.

Obtained on the basis of the new “Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedure” (WLTP), the figures are converted back to the “New European Driving Cycle” (NEDC) for the sake of comparability. Values other than those stated here may be used for the purposes of taxation and for other vehicle-related duties relating to CO2 emissions.

More information about official fuel consumption figures and the official specific CO2 emissions of new passenger cars can be obtained from the “guideline on fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and current consumption of new passenger cars”, available here: https://www.dat.de/co2/.

Original Press Release