Concorso d`Eleganza Villa D`Este 2019. Media-accreditation starts on 24th of January 2019.

BMW:Concorso d`Eleganza Villa D`Este 2019. Media-accreditation starts on 24th of January 2019.

Do you need help? Please contact our support team from 9 to 17 CET via support.pressclub@bmwgroup.com.

PressClub Global · Article.

Thu Jan 24 16:23:00 CET 2019 Press Release

Media accreditation phase for the Concorso D´Eleganza Villa D´Este starts from this day forward. The beauty pageant for historic vehicles will once again be organised jointly by BMW Group Classic and the Grand Hotel Villa d’Este and takes place form 24th until 26th of May 2019.

München/Cernobbio. The beauty pageant for historic
vehicles will once again be organised jointly by BMW Group Classic and
the Grand Hotel Villa d’Este 

This year’s motto:

“The Symphony of Engines – 90 Years of the 
Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este & BMW Automobiles”.

1929 saw the premiere of this competition

and the launch of the first series automobile from BMW – the 3
/15 PS.

Article Media Material.

My.PressClub Login

BMW Group Streaming.

LA AUTO SHOW 2018.

Los Angeles. 28.11.2018. 
Here you will see the on demand transmission of the BMW Press Conference at the LA Auto Show.

open streaming site

CO2 emission information.

The following applies to consumption figures for vehicles with new type approval, September 2017 onward: The figures for fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and energy consumption are obtained in accordance with the specified measuring procedure (EC Regulation No. 715/2007), as issued and amended. The figures are for a basic-version vehicle in Germany. The bandwidths allow for differences in the choice of wheel and tire sizes and items of optional equipment and can be changed by the configuration.

Obtained on the basis of the new “Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedure” (WLTP), the figures are converted back to the “New European Driving Cycle” (NEDC) for the sake of comparability. Values other than those stated here may be used for the purposes of taxation and for other vehicle-related duties relating to CO2 emissions.

More information about official fuel consumption figures and the official specific CO2 emissions of new passenger cars can be obtained from the “guideline on fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and current consumption of new passenger cars”, available here: https://www.dat.de/co2/.

Original Press Release

Top-notch BMW engineering, know-how and passion: the development of Alessandro Zanardi’s driving systems, from 2003 to now.

BMW:Top-notch BMW engineering, know-how and passion: the development of Alessandro Zanardi’s driving systems, from 2003 to now.

Munich. When BMW works driver Alessandro Zanardi (ITA) climbs
behind the wheel of the BMW M8 GTE at the 24 Hours of Daytona (USA,
26th/27th January), he will embark on the
latest chapter of his unprecedented career

.
Zanardi has enjoyed success in BMW race cars for many years.
Just two years after his crash in a CART race at the Lausitzring,
which resulted in the loss of both legs, he was back driving a
specially modified BMW 320i in the 2003 European Touring Car
Championship. Since then, he has raced for BMW M Motorsport in
various series. In the process, he and the BMW M Motorsport
engineers have been continually perfecting the systems that allow
him to race. From the BMW 320i, the BMW Z4 GT3 and the BMW M6 GT3 to
the BMW M4 DTM and the BMW M8 GTE: an overview of the continual
further development of the modifications to Zanardi’s BMW race cars.

 

“When I woke and realised that I no longer had legs, I did not ask
myself: What am I going to do without legs? Instead, I thought: Okay,
what do I need to do to be able to do everything I want to without
legs,” says Zanardi, recalling the time immediately after his crash on
15th September 2001.

His plans included a speedy return to racing. He did initially
encounter a degree of scepticism regarding his comeback plans. After
all, a double leg amputee was something new in the world of
motorsport: “People were afraid that something could happen to me.
However, if I break a leg, all I need is a screwdriver to repair it,”
he explains, with his typical self-deprecating humour. “When I had to
do the medical checks to get my licence, they performed countless
examinations. I felt like they were just looking for an excuse to say:
‘Sorry, you can’t do it’. When they examined my head, I told them:
‘Hey guys, I lost my legs in the crash, not my head!’”

But not everyone was sceptical. In Munich, Zanardi was welcomed with
open arms. “I was fortunate that a fantastic company like BMW was
interested in the project. They were really interested in doing
something more than just showing how technically advanced their
methods were, and how good their cars are. It was about what a person
needs. And the rest is history – here we are now.”

BMW 320i and BMW 320si – ETCC and WTCC.

The story began in 2003 with the BMW 320i. Together with BMW
Motorsport and BMW Team Italy-Spain, which belonged to touring car
legend Roberto Ravaglia (ITA), Zanardi planned to race at the season
finale of the European Touring Car Championship (ETCC) at Monza (ITA).
“At first, I thought that I would have to do everything with my hands.
With the first system, I was braking with a ring on the steering
wheel. I used another ring to accelerate and operated the H gearbox
with my right hand. My fingers operated the clutch, via a button on
the gear lever. I was basically steering using just the ball of my
thumbs,” he recalls. “That was definitely too much. When I came back
to the garage after the first test, I said to the guys: ‘I have so
much to do, I am turning with my arms and hands – but if you could put
a little brush between my legs too, then I could also sweep the cockpit.”

And so it was that Zanardi suggested using his artificial legs: “The
engineers were a little sceptical, but I was sure that I could apply
enough force to the brake pedal if my artificial leg was attached to
it and I could use my hips to apply downward pressure. All we had to
do was to develop a brake pedal to which my artificial leg could be
permanently attached. That proved to be a very efficient solution. I
noticed in the very first test that I could not only apply the
necessary pressure, but was surprised by how well I could control the
pressure and feel the brake pedal.”

The system was decided upon: a ring on the steering wheel was used to
accelerate, the brakes were operated via his artificial leg and the
brake pedal, and the H gearbox was managed with his right hand. This
system was then used in competition: in the ETCC from 2003 to 2004 and
then from 2005 to 2009 in the FIA World Touring Car Championship
(WTCC), in which Zanardi claimed four race wins in the BMW 320i and
BMW 320si. Over the years, the system was consistently optimised and
made more efficient.

BMW Z4 GT3 – Blancpain GT Series.

Having focussed solely on his second passion, paracycling, for
several years after 2010, Zanardi announced his return to motor racing
in 2014. He competed for Ravaglia’s team in the Blancpain GT Sprint
Series – this time in a BMW Z4 GT3. “We transferred everything we had
developed for the BMW 320i to the BMW Z4 GT3. It all worked
perfectly,” says Zanardi. One of the few differences was that he no
longer changed gears using the H gearbox, but via shift paddles on the
steering wheel.

However, circumstances then resulted in another big step forward: in
2015, Zanardi raced alongside Timo Glock (GER) and Bruno Spengler
(CAN) in the 24 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps (BEL). He was now sharing
the cockpit with other drivers – and the BMW engineers were faced with
the task of modifying the BMW Z4 GT3 to allow both Zanardi and his
non-physically impaired team-mates to drive the car. The result was a
“very, very clever solution,” to quote Zanardi.

“I showed the engineers in Munich my artificial leg, which is a
hollow tube, and suggested that we could replace the brake pedal with
a system, in which a kind of pin was slid into the prosthesis,” the
Italian reports. “They embraced the idea and developed a very thin
brake pedal for me, which was fitted to the very right of the pedal
box. Timo and Bruno used the normal accelerator and brake pedals in
the middle of the pedal box.”

The two brake pedals were linked and moved simultaneously. The clutch
pedal was also removed completely from the pedal box and replaced with
a clutch-by-wire system. This system was controlled using two clutch
paddles. Instead of the clutch pedal, a footrest was fitted to the
left of the pedal box for Zanardi. This gave his body extra support
when braking. Zanardi’s steering wheel was also completely new at Spa.
It was based on the steering wheel he had used previously in the BMW
Z4 GT3, but had been optimised in many areas.

BMW M6 GT3.

When Zanardi made his debut in the BMW M6 GT3 in 2016, the system was
improved yet further. The clutch actuator was replaced by a
fully-automatic centrifugal clutch, which was developed by ZF, Premium
Partner of BMW M Motorsport. This opens and closes automatically at a
certain engine speed and need no longer be operated by the driver. For
Zanardi, the system has the major benefit that he no longer needs to
operate a clutch lever with one of his hands.

However, that is not the only reason that Zanardi is impressed by the
centrifugal clutch: “It is astonishing how well this mechanism works.
This clutch is extremely reliable. The wear is minimal and so there
are fewer problems with this solution than with a standard clutch.
Since we installed it in the car, it has done its job perfectly for
us. When you set off again after the pit stop, it is impossible to
stall the engine. Plus, it doesn’t matter whether the tyres are cold
or warm. Whenever you set off, this clutch can manage the grip –
probably better than a standard system.”

Zanardi’s debut in the modified BMW M6 GT3 was a great success: he
took a highly-acclaimed victory in Sunday’s race at the season finale
of the Italian GT Championship at Mugello (ITA).

BMW M4 DTM and BMW M8 GTE.

“The system we had in place at that point allowed me to be quick,
even for a number of laps. But to be honest, it was really difficult
to sit in the car for a long time, to really be of any assistance to
my team over the duration of a 24-hour race,” says Zanardi. As he has
no legs, he lacks important extremities, which help to cool the body
through blood circulation. Furthermore, the close-fitting shafts of
his artificial legs do not allow any perspiration: “Every time I
climbed out of the car, I was thoroughly baked through.”

It was clear to Zanardi that he would be able to drive for far longer
and feel more comfortable in the car without his prostheses. As such,
he sat down with the BMW M Motorsport engineers in Munich and came up
with a completely new system: a system, that would allow Zanardi to
operate everything with his arms and hands. This would have been an
issue in the BMW 320i in 2003, due to the H gearbox, however, the
modern transmission in today’s GT race cars and the now established
centrifugal clutch opened up new possibilities. This was initially
tested in the BMW M6 GT3 and then given its first acid test, which it
passed with flying colours when Zanardi made a guest appearance in the
DTM at the wheel of the BMW M4 DTM at Misano in August 2018. All of
this was leading up to one goal: Zanardi’s start in the BMW M8 GTE at
the 24 Hours of Daytona.

The brake pedal was replaced by a brake lever, which Zanardi pushes
forward with his right arm. This is mounted on the transmission tunnel
and connected to the brake. Zanardi accelerates using a throttle ring
on the steering wheel, which he predominantly operates with his left
hand. He can change gear using a shift paddle on the steering wheel.
At the same time, a switch is also attached to the brake lever, with
which he can shift down through the gears when braking into corners.

Thanks to the hand braking system in the BMW M8 GTE, the physical
problems Zanardi has struggled with in the past are no longer an
issue. “If the regulations allowed it, I could do a 24-hour race on my
own now,” he says, chuckling. “I am really comfortable in the car
without my artificial legs. It is obviously a little bit more
complicated, because I have so much to do with my arms and hands – but
from a physical point of view it is like chalk and cheese.”

Passion is the key.

From the initial drafts in 2003 to the hand braking system in the BMW
M8 GTE – development never stands still in the Zanardi project. For
the Italian, being able to drive a GT race car without his prostheses
is like “winning the race”. However, Zanardi is keen to stress that
none of this would have been possible without the tireless efforts of
the BMW M Motorsport engineers: “It obviously takes skill and effort –
but above all that, you need passion. When the engineers are taking
their work back home with them to their families, that shows how
passionate they are. What we have here is the result of an enormous
amount of commitment and passion, coupled with immense expertise.”

The hand braking system in the BMW M8 GTE also opens “a new
dimension,” he emphasised. “BMW has introduced another real innovation
with this. This system also works for others. Anyone who is unable to
use their legs but has two arms could drive this car.”

When he wanted to race again after his crash, he was met with great
scepticism. That would not be the case today – and Zanardi and BMW M
Motorsport have been instrumental in changing this attitude: “It has
been a long road, but I believe that what we have achieved has also
created new possibilities for others. No longer does anyone ask
whether a disabled driver can race. Take Frederic Sausset: he had both
his legs and arms amputated and still raced in the 24 Hours of Le Mans
in 2016. Or Billy Monger. The only thing people want to know nowadays
is how good a driver you are. Disabilities do not matter, as they know
that you can overcome them with special solutions.”

An overview of Alessandro Zanardi’s driving systems.

BMW 320i and BMW 320si (2003-2009): Modified brake
pedal, attached to the artificial leg; steering wheel with ring for
accelerating; gears changed using H gear lever, operated with right hand

BMW Z4 GT3 – Blancpain GT Series (2014): Modified
brake pedal, attached to the artificial leg; steering wheel with ring
for accelerating; gears changed using shift paddles on steering wheel

BMW Z4 GT3 – 24h Spa (2015): New, very thin brake
pedal added to the pedal box and inserted into the prosthetic leg like
a pin; steering wheel with ring for accelerating; gears changed using
shift paddles on steering wheel; clutch-by-wire system with clutch paddles

BMW M6 GT3 (2016): Thin brake pedal, similar to 24h
Spa; steering wheel with ring for accelerating; gears changed using
shift paddles on steering wheel; newly-developed centrifugal clutch

BMW M4 DTM and BMW M8 GTE (2018-2019): Hand-operated
brake lever for braking; steering wheel with ring for accelerating;
upshift via paddle on steering wheel, downshift via button on brake
lever, centrifugal clutch

Original Press Release

oncorso d`Eleganza Villa D`Este 2019. Media-accreditation starts on 24th of January 2019.

BMW:oncorso d`Eleganza Villa D`Este 2019. Media-accreditation starts on 24th of January 2019.

Do you need help? Please contact our support team from 9 to 17 CET via support.pressclub@bmwgroup.com.

PressClub Global · Article.

Thu Jan 24 16:23:36 CET 2019 Press Release

Media accreditation phase for the Concorso D´Eleganza Villa D´Este starts from this day forward. The beauty pageant for historic vehicles will once again be organised jointly by BMW Group Classic and the Grand Hotel Villa d’Este and takes place form 24th until 26th of May 2019.

München/Cernobbio. The beauty pageant for historic
vehicles will once again be organised jointly by BMW Group Classic and
the Grand Hotel Villa d’Este 

This year’s motto:

“The Symphony of Engines – 90 Years of the 
Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este & BMW Automobiles”.

1929 saw the premiere of this competition

and the launch of the first series automobile from BMW – the 3
/15 PS.

Article Media Material.

My.PressClub Login

BMW Group Streaming.

LA AUTO SHOW 2018.

Los Angeles. 28.11.2018. 
Here you will see the on demand transmission of the BMW Press Conference at the LA Auto Show.

open streaming site

CO2 emission information.

The following applies to consumption figures for vehicles with new type approval, September 2017 onward: The figures for fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and energy consumption are obtained in accordance with the specified measuring procedure (EC Regulation No. 715/2007), as issued and amended. The figures are for a basic-version vehicle in Germany. The bandwidths allow for differences in the choice of wheel and tire sizes and items of optional equipment and can be changed by the configuration.

Obtained on the basis of the new “Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedure” (WLTP), the figures are converted back to the “New European Driving Cycle” (NEDC) for the sake of comparability. Values other than those stated here may be used for the purposes of taxation and for other vehicle-related duties relating to CO2 emissions.

More information about official fuel consumption figures and the official specific CO2 emissions of new passenger cars can be obtained from the “guideline on fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and current consumption of new passenger cars”, available here: https://www.dat.de/co2/.

Original Press Release

Top-notch BMW engineering, know-how and passion: the development of Alessandro Zanardi’s driving systems, from 2003 to now.

BMW:Top-notch BMW engineering, know-how and passion: the development of Alessandro Zanardi’s driving systems, from 2003 to now.

Munich. When BMW works driver Alessandro Zanardi (ITA) climbs
behind the wheel of the BMW M8 GTE at the 24 Hours of Daytona (USA,
26th/27th January), he will embark on the
latest chapter of his unprecedented career

.
Zanardi has enjoyed success in BMW race cars for many years.
Just two years after his crash in a CART race at the Lausitzring,
which resulted in the loss of both legs, he was back driving a
specially modified BMW 320i in the 2003 European Touring Car
Championship. Since then, he has raced for BMW M Motorsport in
various series. In the process, he and the BMW M Motorsport
engineers have been continually perfecting the systems that allow
him to race. From the BMW 320i, the BMW Z4 GT3 and the BMW M6 GT3 to
the BMW M4 DTM and the BMW M8 GTE: an overview of the continual
further development of the modifications to Zanardi’s BMW race cars.

 

“When I woke and realised that I no longer had legs, I did not ask
myself: What am I going to do without legs? Instead, I thought: Okay,
what do I need to do to be able to do everything I want to without
legs,” says Zanardi, recalling the time immediately after his crash on
15th September 2001.

His plans included a speedy return to racing. He did initially
encounter a degree of scepticism regarding his comeback plans. After
all, a double leg amputee was something new in the world of
motorsport: “People were afraid that something could happen to me.
However, if I break a leg, all I need is a screwdriver to repair it,”
he explains, with his typical self-deprecating humour. “When I had to
do the medical checks to get my licence, they performed countless
examinations. I felt like they were just looking for an excuse to say:
‘Sorry, you can’t do it’. When they examined my head, I told them:
‘Hey guys, I lost my legs in the crash, not my head!’”

But not everyone was sceptical. In Munich, Zanardi was welcomed with
open arms. “I was fortunate that a fantastic company like BMW was
interested in the project. They were really interested in doing
something more than just showing how technically advanced their
methods were, and how good their cars are. It was about what a person
needs. And the rest is history – here we are now.”

BMW 320i and BMW 320si – ETCC and WTCC.

The story began in 2003 with the BMW 320i. Together with BMW
Motorsport and BMW Team Italy-Spain, which belonged to touring car
legend Roberto Ravaglia (ITA), Zanardi planned to race at the season
finale of the European Touring Car Championship (ETCC) at Monza (ITA).
“At first, I thought that I would have to do everything with my hands.
With the first system, I was braking with a ring on the steering
wheel. I used another ring to accelerate and operated the H gearbox
with my right hand. My fingers operated the clutch, via a button on
the gear lever. I was basically steering using just the ball of my
thumbs,” he recalls. “That was definitely too much. When I came back
to the garage after the first test, I said to the guys: ‘I have so
much to do, I am turning with my arms and hands – but if you could put
a little brush between my legs too, then I could also sweep the cockpit.”

And so it was that Zanardi suggested using his artificial legs: “The
engineers were a little sceptical, but I was sure that I could apply
enough force to the brake pedal if my artificial leg was attached to
it and I could use my hips to apply downward pressure. All we had to
do was to develop a brake pedal to which my artificial leg could be
permanently attached. That proved to be a very efficient solution. I
noticed in the very first test that I could not only apply the
necessary pressure, but was surprised by how well I could control the
pressure and feel the brake pedal.”

The system was decided upon: a ring on the steering wheel was used to
accelerate, the brakes were operated via his artificial leg and the
brake pedal, and the H gearbox was managed with his right hand. This
system was then used in competition: in the ETCC from 2003 to 2004 and
then from 2005 to 2009 in the FIA World Touring Car Championship
(WTCC), in which Zanardi claimed four race wins in the BMW 320i and
BMW 320si. Over the years, the system was consistently optimised and
made more efficient.

BMW Z4 GT3 – Blancpain GT Series.

Having focussed solely on his second passion, paracycling, for
several years after 2010, Zanardi announced his return to motor racing
in 2014. He competed for Ravaglia’s team in the Blancpain GT Sprint
Series – this time in a BMW Z4 GT3. “We transferred everything we had
developed for the BMW 320i to the BMW Z4 GT3. It all worked
perfectly,” says Zanardi. One of the few differences was that he no
longer changed gears using the H gearbox, but via shift paddles on the
steering wheel.

However, circumstances then resulted in another big step forward: in
2015, Zanardi raced alongside Timo Glock (GER) and Bruno Spengler
(CAN) in the 24 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps (BEL). He was now sharing
the cockpit with other drivers – and the BMW engineers were faced with
the task of modifying the BMW Z4 GT3 to allow both Zanardi and his
non-physically impaired team-mates to drive the car. The result was a
“very, very clever solution,” to quote Zanardi.

“I showed the engineers in Munich my artificial leg, which is a
hollow tube, and suggested that we could replace the brake pedal with
a system, in which a kind of pin was slid into the prosthesis,” the
Italian reports. “They embraced the idea and developed a very thin
brake pedal for me, which was fitted to the very right of the pedal
box. Timo and Bruno used the normal accelerator and brake pedals in
the middle of the pedal box.”

The two brake pedals were linked and moved simultaneously. The clutch
pedal was also removed completely from the pedal box and replaced with
a clutch-by-wire system. This system was controlled using two clutch
paddles. Instead of the clutch pedal, a footrest was fitted to the
left of the pedal box for Zanardi. This gave his body extra support
when braking. Zanardi’s steering wheel was also completely new at Spa.
It was based on the steering wheel he had used previously in the BMW
Z4 GT3, but had been optimised in many areas.

BMW M6 GT3.

When Zanardi made his debut in the BMW M6 GT3 in 2016, the system was
improved yet further. The clutch actuator was replaced by a
fully-automatic centrifugal clutch, which was developed by ZF, Premium
Partner of BMW M Motorsport. This opens and closes automatically at a
certain engine speed and need no longer be operated by the driver. For
Zanardi, the system has the major benefit that he no longer needs to
operate a clutch lever with one of his hands.

However, that is not the only reason that Zanardi is impressed by the
centrifugal clutch: “It is astonishing how well this mechanism works.
This clutch is extremely reliable. The wear is minimal and so there
are fewer problems with this solution than with a standard clutch.
Since we installed it in the car, it has done its job perfectly for
us. When you set off again after the pit stop, it is impossible to
stall the engine. Plus, it doesn’t matter whether the tyres are cold
or warm. Whenever you set off, this clutch can manage the grip –
probably better than a standard system.”

Zanardi’s debut in the modified BMW M6 GT3 was a great success: he
took a highly-acclaimed victory in Sunday’s race at the season finale
of the Italian GT Championship at Mugello (ITA).

BMW M4 DTM and BMW M8 GTE.

“The system we had in place at that point allowed me to be quick,
even for a number of laps. But to be honest, it was really difficult
to sit in the car for a long time, to really be of any assistance to
my team over the duration of a 24-hour race,” says Zanardi. As he has
no legs, he lacks important extremities, which help to cool the body
through blood circulation. Furthermore, the close-fitting shafts of
his artificial legs do not allow any perspiration: “Every time I
climbed out of the car, I was thoroughly baked through.”

It was clear to Zanardi that he would be able to drive for far longer
and feel more comfortable in the car without his prostheses. As such,
he sat down with the BMW M Motorsport engineers in Munich and came up
with a completely new system: a system, that would allow Zanardi to
operate everything with his arms and hands. This would have been an
issue in the BMW 320i in 2003, due to the H gearbox, however, the
modern transmission in today’s GT race cars and the now established
centrifugal clutch opened up new possibilities. This was initially
tested in the BMW M6 GT3 and then given its first acid test, which it
passed with flying colours when Zanardi made a guest appearance in the
DTM at the wheel of the BMW M4 DTM at Misano in August 2018. All of
this was leading up to one goal: Zanardi’s start in the BMW M8 GTE at
the 24 Hours of Daytona.

The brake pedal was replaced by a brake lever, which Zanardi pushes
forward with his right arm. This is mounted on the transmission tunnel
and connected to the brake. Zanardi accelerates using a throttle ring
on the steering wheel, which he predominantly operates with his left
hand. He can change gear using a shift paddle on the steering wheel.
At the same time, a switch is also attached to the brake lever, with
which he can shift down through the gears when braking into corners.

Thanks to the hand braking system in the BMW M8 GTE, the physical
problems Zanardi has struggled with in the past are no longer an
issue. “If the regulations allowed it, I could do a 24-hour race on my
own now,” he says, chuckling. “I am really comfortable in the car
without my artificial legs. It is obviously a little bit more
complicated, because I have so much to do with my arms and hands – but
from a physical point of view it is like chalk and cheese.”

Passion is the key.

From the initial drafts in 2003 to the hand braking system in the BMW
M8 GTE – development never stands still in the Zanardi project. For
the Italian, being able to drive a GT race car without his prostheses
is like “winning the race”. However, Zanardi is keen to stress that
none of this would have been possible without the tireless efforts of
the BMW M Motorsport engineers: “It obviously takes skill and effort –
but above all that, you need passion. When the engineers are taking
their work back home with them to their families, that shows how
passionate they are. What we have here is the result of an enormous
amount of commitment and passion, coupled with immense expertise.”

The hand braking system in the BMW M8 GTE also opens “a new
dimension,” he emphasised. “BMW has introduced another real innovation
with this. This system also works for others. Anyone who is unable to
use their legs but has two arms could drive this car.”

When he wanted to race again after his crash, he was met with great
scepticism. That would not be the case today – and Zanardi and BMW M
Motorsport have been instrumental in changing this attitude: “It has
been a long road, but I believe that what we have achieved has also
created new possibilities for others. No longer does anyone ask
whether a disabled driver can race. Take Frederic Sausset: he had both
his legs and arms amputated and still raced in the 24 Hours of Le Mans
in 2016. Or Billy Monger. The only thing people want to know nowadays
is how good a driver you are. Disabilities do not matter, as they know
that you can overcome them with special solutions.”

An overview of Alessandro Zanardi’s driving systems.

BMW 320i and BMW 320si (2003-2009): Modified brake
pedal, attached to the artificial leg; steering wheel with ring for
accelerating; gears changed using H gear lever, operated with right hand

BMW Z4 GT3 – Blancpain GT Series (2014): Modified
brake pedal, attached to the artificial leg; steering wheel with ring
for accelerating; gears changed using shift paddles on steering wheel

BMW Z4 GT3 – 24h Spa (2015): New, very thin brake
pedal added to the pedal box and inserted into the prosthetic leg like
a pin; steering wheel with ring for accelerating; gears changed using
shift paddles on steering wheel; clutch-by-wire system with clutch paddles

BMW M6 GT3 (2016): Thin brake pedal, similar to 24h
Spa; steering wheel with ring for accelerating; gears changed using
shift paddles on steering wheel; newly-developed centrifugal clutch

BMW M4 DTM and BMW M8 GTE (2018-2019): Hand-operated
brake lever for braking; steering wheel with ring for accelerating;
upshift via paddle on steering wheel, downshift via button on brake
lever, centrifugal clutch

Original Press Release

BMW i Andretti Motorsport eager to pick up points with both cars in Santiago.

BMW:BMW i Andretti Motorsport eager to pick up points with both cars in Santiago.

Munich. After two strong performances at the season opener of
the ABB FIA Formula E Championship, BMW i Andretti Motorsport heads
to the Santiago E-Prix in Chile with the renewed aim of finishing in
the points with both BMW iFE.18. António Félix da Costa (POR) and
Alexander Sims (GBR) are determined to make up for the missed
Marrakesh (MAR) points in the Chilean capital. Michael Andretti, CEO
of Andretti Autosport, will be on site to support the team at the
third Formula E race of the season.

 

Quotes ahead of the Santiago E-Prix:

 

Jens Marquardt (BMW Motorsport Director):

“We’ve moved on from the Marrakesh race and the team is really
looking forward to Santiago. Even though we didn’t pick up as many
points as was possible there, the BMW iFE.18 was convincing once
again. The performance of the car is right and both drivers are very
fast which is why we are optimistic that we will be up there at the
front again in Santiago. The objective is to get the maximum points
haul with both cars this time.”

 

Michael Andretti (CEO Andretti Autosport):

“I am excited for Formula E and BMW i Andretti Motorsport to return
to the Santiago E-Prix, which was a great race and event last season.
The South American people are incredibly passionate about motorsport
and we always enjoy getting to race in front of such a great group of
fans. We are only two races into the Formula E season, and the team
has already proved what we are capable of. Going into Santiago, we
just need to capitalise on that potential, minimise mistakes, and I
know we can compete for another great result. We won our first race in
Round 1, ran at the front in Round 2 and now we want to get back on
the podium in Round 3.”

 

Alexander Sims (#27 BMW iFE.18):
“I’m really
looking forward to Santiago de Chile. It’s definitely going to be
exciting to race there  and to get on with another race weekend. From
my personal point of view  I’m going to try  to learn as much as I can
at this new track. We’ve shown promising pace at Marrakesh, so I can’t
wait to get back in the car to hopefully repeat that, but my goal is
to keep learning and improving.”

 

António Félix da Costa (#28 BMW iFE.18):

“After having raced in Santiago de Chile last year for the first time
for me and for Formula E we’ve felt an amazing atmosphere and it was a
very cool event, so I’m looking forward to going back. Obviously, we
had a really strong start to the season for the team. We’ve shown a
lot of performance. After the outcome of the race in Marrakesh and
going home with zero points after this strong pace from the car and
the team, I now can’t wait to get back in race mode as soon as I can
and to use this race to redeem myself and to get back in the championship.”

 

The FANBOOST vote.

FANBOOST gives Formula E fans the opportunity to vote for their
favourite driver and award them an extra boost of power during the
race. The five drivers with the most FANBOOST votes are awarded a
significant burst of power, which they can deploy in a five-second
window during the second half of the race. Fans can vote for their
favourite driver in the six days prior to, and leading up to 15
minutes into, each race. Each fan can vote once per day. There are
three ways to vote: Online at https://fanboost.fiaformulae.com/,
via the official Formula E App or on Twitter using the hashtag
#FANBOOST plus the drivers first and last name as a one-word hashtag.

Hashtags of the BMW i Andretti Motorsport drivers:

#AlexanderSims

#AntonioFelixdaCosta

 

The BMW i Fleet

BMW i is “Official Vehicle Partner” of the ABB FIA Formula E
Championship in Season 5. Spearheading the BMW i fleet is the BMW i8
Coupé Safety Car, modified with BMW M components (combined fuel
consumption: 1.8 l/100 km; combined energy consumption 14.0 kWh/100
km; combined CO2 emissions: 42 g/km)*. As well as the BMW
i8 Coupé, the BMW i fleet also includes the BMW i3s (combined fuel
consumption: 0.0 l/100 km; combined energy consumption: 14.3 kWh;
combined CO2 emissions: 0 g/km)* as “Race Director Car” and
the BMW 530e iPerformance (combined fuel consumption: 2.2-2.1 l/100
km; combined energy consumption: 13.6-13.3 kWh/100 km; combined
CO2 emissions: 49-47 g/km)* in its role as “Medical Car”.

The values for fuel consumption, CO2 emission and energy consumption
shown were determined in the standardized test cycle according to the
European Regulation (EC) 715/2007 in the version applicable at the
time of type approval. The figures refer to a vehicle with basic
configuration in Germany and the range shown considers optional
equipment and the different size of wheels and tires available on the
selected model.
The values are already based on the test cycle
according to the new WLTP regulation and are translated back into
NEDC-equivalent values in order to allow a comparison between
vehicles. With respect to these vehicles, for vehicle related taxes or
other duties based (at least inter alia) on CO2-emissions the CO2
values may differ to the values stated here.
Effective
06.12.2018
Further information about the official fuel
consumption and the official specific CO2 emission of new passenger
cars can be taken out of the „handbook of fuel consumption, the CO2
emission and power consumption of new passenger cars“, which is
available at all selling points and fromDeutsche Automobil Treuhand
GmbH (DAT), Hellmuth-Hirth-Str. 1, 73760 Ostfildern-Scharnhausen, and
under https://www.dat.de/co2/.

Original Press Release

Above the clouds: The new BMW 7 Series – ready for a luxury experience at the highest level.

BMW:Above the clouds: The new BMW 7 Series – ready for a luxury experience at the highest level.

Munich. With the new BMW 7 Series, driving pleasure
and ride experience reach an unprecedented new level in the luxury
segment. After the world premiere of the luxury sedan in Shanghai, now
the market launch campaign for the new BMW 7 Series follows with a
powerfully emotional film at its centre. The campaign film, designed
for use on different communication channels, presents the new BMW 7
Series using atmospheric imagery as the perfect choice for
individualists who are not deterred by any obstacles in their way, but
who follow their own path with self-assured confidence.

The short film titled “Above the Clouds”, directed by the American
Dan DiFelice, shows the pilot of a private plane who is prevented from
taking off in his plane by bad weather and who then makes a
spontaneous decision. He swaps his “cockpit” for that of his new BMW 7
Series and accelerates down the dark and rainy runway unhindered. His
journey takes him into majestic mountain scenery and he travels higher
and higher. Finally we see how he breaks through the cloud cover on a
mountain pass road in his car, heads towards the sunlight and leaves
the black storm behind him. The key scene of the film describes a
luxurious experience at the highest level creating a sublime moment,
which is generally reserved for the pilot of a plane, but in this
scenario can literally only be experienced in the new BMW 7 Series.

The new luxury sedan becomes the symbol of how limits can be overcome
through your own initiative and self-confidence, how the freedom of
individual mobility can be expanded and how new horizons then open up.
“With its self-assured character, the new BMW 7 Series embodies the
way of life of a target group who follows its aims and ideas in a
self-determined and independent manner regardless of any external
obstacles”, says Uwe Dreher, Director Brand Communication BMW, BMW i
and BMW M.

After the new BMW 8 Series Coupé, the new BMW 8 Series Convertible
and the new BMW X7, the new BMW 7 Series is the fourth model to be
presented and launched against the background of a new brand presence
in the luxury segment. The launch is characterised by a newly designed
signet and the company name Bayerische Motoren Werke, which is fully
written out. For the BMW Group, the brand’s current initiative in the
luxury segment is one of the objectives set out in the NUMBER ONE >
NEXT company strategy to ensure sustainable growth on the worldwide
automobile markets. In addition the new BMW 7 Series features a unique
variety on innovations in the four future-oriented ACES fields
(Autonomous, Connected, Electrified, Services/Shared).

The entire BMW 7 Series launch campaign has been designed in line
with the new aesthetic appearance of the brand in the luxury segment.
Just like the campaign film, all other communication materials
including the sales literature and the online channels of the new BMW
7 Series are harmoniously coordinated with each other in order to
provide the target groups in this vehicle class with an integrated and
holistic world of experience.  “The launch campaign for the new BMW 7
Series highlights the luxury sedan’s unique combination of presence,
exclusivity and innovation using powerful imagery and emotional
staging”, says Kirsty Skinner-Gerth, Head of International Campaigns,
Artwork, Film, Entertainment Marketing. The campaign was devised by
the BMW Group in conjunction with Serviceplan Campaign International.
In addition to the campaign film, a product highlight film as well as
several cutdowns for different social media channels have been
produced. In this way the cinematic atmosphere, which symbolises the
character of the new BMW 7 Series, is authentically transferred to all
communication channels.

For the BMW Group the following persons were responsible for the
campaign:
Uwe Dreher, Director Brand Communication BMW BMW i BMW
M
Kirsty Skinner-Gerth, Head of International Campaigns, Artwork,
Film, Entertainment Marketing
Ann-Kathrin Geertz, International
Campaigns BMW, BMW i, BMW M
Gabriele Lemmle, International
Campaigns BMW, BMW i, BMW M, Project Manager THE 7

Original Press Release

IMSA season kicks off with a highlight: BMW Team RLL ready for the 24 Hours of Daytona.

BMW:IMSA season kicks off with a highlight: BMW Team RLL ready for the 24 Hours of Daytona.

Munich. The 2019 motorsport year begins with a true highlight
for BMW Team RLL: the 24 Hours of Daytona (USA) this coming weekend
(26th/27th January). The endurance classic
traditionally opens the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship. The
BMW M8 GTE, which made its competitive debut at Daytona in 2018, is
now entering its second season in the IMSA. As it did last year, BMW
Team RLL will field two BMW M8 GTEs in the GTLM class in 2019. BMW
works driver Alessandro Zanardi’s (ITA) start at Daytona is of
particular interest.

 

Zanardi will contest the 24-hour race in the #24 BMW M8 GTE run by
BMW Team RLL, alongside regular drivers John Edwards (USA) and Jesse
Krohn (FIN), as well as Chaz Mostert (AUS). Alternating at the wheel
of the #25 car will be regular driver Connor De Phillippi (USA),
Augusto Farfus (BRA), Philipp Eng (AUT) and Colton Herta (USA).

The team was at Daytona at the start of January, when it continued
its preparations for the marathon race with the official ‘Roar’ test.
The 24 Hours of Daytona gets underway at 14:35 local time on Saturday
26th January. The race finishes at 14:35 on Sunday
27th January.

The Turner Motorsport team runs a BMW M6 GT3 in the GTD class in the
2019 IMSA series. The car will be driven at Daytona by Jens Klingmann
(GER), Bill Auberlen (USA), Robby Foley (USA) and Dillon Machavern
(USA). Turner Motorsport will also compete with a BMW M4 GT4 in the GS
class of the Michelin Pilot Challenge, which also stages its opening
race of the season at Daytona. In total, five BMW M4 GT4s will be in
action in the ‘BMW Endurance Challenge At Daytona’.

Quotes ahead of the 24-hour race at Daytona.

Jens Marquardt (BMW Motorsport Director): “The 24
Hours of Daytona are always a real highlight at the start of the new
motorsport season. Last year, our BMW M8 GTE made its race debut
there. In the meantime, it has evolved into a winning car and we are
excited about our prospects for the coming weekend. BMW Team RLL and
our engineers have worked hard in recent months to ensure that they
are as well prepared as possible for the 24 Hours of Daytona and the
2019 IMSA season. Alex Zanardi’s start will help make Daytona a very
special event this year. It is fantastic to see him in the BMW M8 GTE.
We can look forward to a particularly spectacular race this year.”

Alessandro Zanardi (#24 BMW M8 GTE): “As a race fan,
which is what I am and always have been, I am super excited. I am
living a dream. I was expecting a lot of support from the fans and my
friends at Daytona, but already at the Roar it went beyond all
expectations. We are going to make sure that we have a good race car
and that we can perform consistently. We’ll start from there.”

John Edwards (#24 BMW M8 GTE): “Compared to last year
we are feeling much better prepared. We were able to focus fully on
the car set-up and driver change-over during this year’s Roar test.
They are obviously a little unique with Alex, but we are quick. With a
bit more practice during the race weekend, I don’t expect us to lose
any time in the pit stops. It’s really an honour to drive and work
with Alex and to get to know him a little bit better and see his
perspective on life. Hopefully that positive attitude will transfer
into a good result for us at the 24 Hours.”

Jesse Krohn (#24 BMW M8 GTE): “I have high
expectations, obviously, having seen what the team did at the Roar and
how the car performed. We just need to keep out of trouble and have a
clean race. To work with Alex is the best thing I’ve ever done. It’s a
rare opportunity and a blessing to be able to work with such a legend.
I enjoy every moment and try to spend as much time with him as I can.”

Chaz Mostert (#24 BMW M8 GTE): “For us in Australia,
this is one of the biggest races in the world. It was so awesome to
get the call to race here. I am super excited to be part of the team
and I can’t thank everyone enough. I’m really looking forward to the
race. The whole team is pulling together and I am ready pull my weight
and make sure we have the best possibility of a top result. It’s also
great to race in a team with Alex. He is a true legend and it’s good
fun to work with him”

Connor De Phillippi (#25 BMW M8 GTE): “We did our
homework at the Roar. Of course, we still have some areas to improve
on, but we went through a lot of the processes and driver changes and
pit stop work to prepare for the big 24-hour race. The car is good and
we know that we are going to be very competitive.”

Augusto Farfus (#25 BMW M8 GTE): “The 24-hour race at
Daytona is just a fantastic event. I feel very sorry for Tom Blomqvist
that he will miss the race but I am happy to take part and being able
to help the team and also to be considered by BMW to replace him. I
will make every effort to substitute for Tom in the best possible way.”

Philipp Eng (#25 BMW M8 GTE): “I am really looking
forward to driving at Daytona again. It will be my third appearance in
this 24-hour race. I believe we have a good package. You can see in
everyone’s faces that we are all extremely determined to come away
with a top result. That is what it is all about. I hope that at least
four of us always know what time it is on the flight home – because
they have a nice new watch on their wrist.“

Colton Herta (#25 BMW M8 GTE): “I have no idea what
to expect. I’ve never been in a race like this before. GTLM is a super
competitive category and I think BMW has done a great job and a great
deal of work over the last year with the BMW M8 GTE, getting it to
where it is. I know it started off rough but now we have the car that
we want. It’s very fast and very competitive. If we play our cards
right and we have enough luck, we can get a really top result. I’ve
always wanted to do this race. My father competed in it for a long
time and it’s such an iconic race, not only in America but all around
the world. To finally get the chance to do it is super exciting.”

Original Press Release

BMW Motorsport News – Issue 03/2019.

BMW:BMW Motorsport News – Issue 03/2019.

Whether in the DTM, the FIA World Endurance Championship, the
IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, the ABB FIA Formula E
Championship, or countless other championships: Week after week BMW
teams and drivers around the world do battle for points, victories
and titles. Away from the track too, members of the large BMW
Motorsport family around the world are also creating headlines. The
“BMW Motorsport News” allows us to regularly summarise all the
action for you in a compact and informative manner. This way, you
are always up to speed.

In 2019, Sheldon van der Linde (RSA) will be the
first South African driver to compete in the DTM. In this interview,
the new BMW works driver talks about his great DTM dream, expectations
for his maiden season and the continuation of a family tradition.

Three questions for… Sheldon van der Linde.

Sheldon, how does it feel to be a BMW DTM driver?

Sheldon van der Linde: “It feels quite unreal at the moment I
have to say. I think by the time I’m standing at the grid in
Hockenheim it will feel more real. Before that there is a lot of
preparation that has to be done. The DTM has always been a dream of
mine. To reach that goal is such a relief and an achievement that
brings motivation. And for sure I’m very excited to join the BMW
family as well.”

What has been your connection to BMW in the past?

Van der Linde: “My dad has been driving for BMW in South Africa
for many years as a works driver as well. That is a very cool
connection. It feels fantastic to continue the family tradition in
that way and I’m very excited to keep the name ‘van der Linde’ high in
the BMW family.”

What are your expectations for your maiden DTM season?

Van der Linde: “Of course it is not going to be easy at all.
It’s the best touring car championship in the world for a reason. It’s
all the best drivers in one series. It’s not going to be easy and I
will have a lot to learn, especially coming from GT3. But I know I
have the right team around me to support me in that way to really get
the best out of the complete package, so I’m very confident that we
can do a good job. Like I said, there are a lot of things that need to
be done, and I’m really looking forward to Hockenheim in May.”

24h Daytona: Farfus to compete in #25 BMW M8 GTE.

BMW Team RLL has substituted a driver in the line-up for this
weekend’s Rolex 24 At Daytona (USA). BMW works driver Augusto Farfus
(BRA) will take the place of Tom Blomqvist (GBR) who has experienced
delays with his visa application. Farfus will share the #25 BMW M8 GTE
with Connor De Phillippi (USA), Philipp Eng (AUT) and Colton Herta
(USA). Farfus has raced with BMW Team RLL four times previously at
Daytona – in 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018 with a best finish of second
in 2015. Blomqvist is expected to re-join the #25 car roster for
Sebring (USA) and the rest of the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar
Championship season. “I’m very disappointed that I am unable to race
at Daytona,” said Blomqvist. “I will be back home with my fingers
crossed for the whole team and looking forward to returning at
Sebring.” Farfus: “I love the Rolex 24 At Daytona. I know the team,
the car and the circuit very well and am ready for this challenge.”

Original Press Release

BMW Group Classic at Rétromobile 2019 in Paris

BMW:BMW Group Classic at Rétromobile 2019 in Paris

Munich/Paris. Paris will become the city of love for
classic cars for five days. At the Rétromobile 2019 exhibition, fans
and potential purchasers of classic cars and motorcycles will find
everything their hearts desire from 6 to 10 February 2019. BMW Group
Classic has joined forces with BMW France and French BMW Clubs to
feature a number of exciting chapters in the brand history at
Rétromobile 2019. The recent history of BMW roadsters, the long
tradition of the brand in the luxury segment, and the history of motor
sport over the past four decades is presented through the prism of the
fascinating exhibition vehicles. Classics on two wheels are also being
presented, alongside services in the areas of parts sales, vehicle
dealership and archives. The exhibition in Paris also offers a window
onto the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este 2019.

Rétromobile is one of the biggest and most diverse exhibitions of
classic vehicles in Europe. Around 650 exhibitors from all over the
world will be represented in the 44th edition of the event at the
Porte de Versailles exhibition complex in Paris. More than 600
historic vehicles will be shown on an area of some 6 700 square metres
in exhibition halls 1, 2 and 3. Many of them will be for sale, along
with replacement parts, workshop equipment and lots of other products
to excite fans of classic vehicles. The rare treasures presented by
BMW will be shown in Hall 1 at an exhibition stand divided into
several sections each with a dedicated theme. Passepartout frames
mounted in the partition walls provide visitors with a view of other
sections of the exhibition stand from a variety of different perspectives.

BMW Group Classic celebrated its presentation at Rétromobile 2019 by
announcing that owners of classic vehicles in France would have access
to enhanced service packages in future. This is being achieved by
extending the international network of BMW Classic Partners to French
locations. The Certified BMW Classic Partners will be offering fans
and owners of historic automobiles comprehensive and professional
service packages in the areas of repair, restoration and parts supply,
as well as specialist advice about the purchase and sale of vehicles.
The network of BMW Classic Partners currently covers sites in Germany,
Austria, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Belgium and the USA.

Once pioneering, today a classic car: the BMW Z1.

The roadsters of the BMW brand have always epitomised open-top
driving pleasure for two people. Some 30 years ago, the first examples
of the BMW Z1 were delivered to expectant customers. Originally, the
two-seater was a development project run by BMW Technik GmbH, designed
to enrich knowledge about innovative vehicle structures and materials
in the course of the project. The plastic body mounted on a
self-supporting steel chassis, the retractable doors and the agile
driving performance generated enthusiasm right from the start. Today,
this passion is shared by fans of youngtimers and classic cars alike.
One of the 8 000 BMW Z1 automobiles delivered up until 1991 will be
presented at the Rétromobile 2019 and offered for sale. The vehicle
has been restored to its original condition and although it is only on
the threshold of classic-car status, it is nevertheless already one of
the coveted collectibles from the model history of the brand. A
comparison between the BMW Z1 and the new BMW Z4 – set to make waves
from March 2019 – shows that the universal attraction of an open-top
sports car retains its lustre to this day.

BMW 507: sportiness and luxury in the open air – and on the water.

Almost three and a half decades before sales of the BMW Z1 were
launched, another roadster that has meanwhile become a legend was
creating a sensation for the first time. The BMW 507 was presented at
the International Motor Show in Frankfurt in 1955. It embodies dynamic
performance, elegance and a generous portion of luxury. In 1957, BMW
commissioned Starnberg-based boatbuilder Werft A. Rambeck to construct
a speedboat on the basis of the numerous design attributes in the
styling of the road-going vehicle. The speedboat was powered by the
BMW 401 marine engine derived from the automobile powerplant, and at
150 hp it precisely matched the power of the eight-cylinder unit
mounted in the BMW 507. The unique special was long believed to have
been lost, but the boat was discovered a few years ago and restored by
Werft Rambeck. At Rétromobile 2019, BMW Group Classic is presenting
the roadster and the boat together with the new BMW 8 Series
convertible, which transfers the combination of sportiness, luxury and
open-top joy to the present day.

Racing car for the BMW Junior Team and the Procar Series.

Two outstanding competition vehicles recall the glory days of the
1970s in motor sport with two outstanding competition vehicles. A BMW
320 built in accordance with Group 5 regulations is presented in
homage to a successful era of the brand in touring-car sport. Front
spoilers, rear wings and flared wheel arches with flamboyant styling
characterise the competition vehicle developed on the basis of the
first generation of the BMW 3 Series. Under the bonnet, the car is
powered by a Formula 2 racing engine, which generates an output of 300
hp from a displacement of 2.0 litres. In 1977, BMW competed with the
new touring car in the German Racing Championship (DRM). At the same
time, this formed the launchpad for a new form of promotion for junior
drivers. Eddie Cheever, Marc Surer and Manfred Winkelhock competed in
the BMW Junior Team against established, world-class drivers. They
became the darlings of the public and collected a bumper harvest of points.

Two years later, drivers lined up at the start of the first races in
the Procar Series initiated by BMW. This was an ideal stage to put the
racing version of the BMW M1 through its paces. In the Procar Series,
Formula 1 pilots and touring-car drivers competed against each other
in identically engineered vehicles powered by 470 hp engines. The
races were held in 1979 and 1980 as part of the warm-up for the
Formula 1 World Championship races in Europe and they developed into a
massive success with a big public following. A Procar racer from the
collection of BMW Group Classic is being presented at Rétromobile 2019.

Pioneering collectibles with Boxer engines.

Connoisseurs and collectors of historic two-wheelers will be
delighted with the exhibits shown in the section of the exhibition
stand dedicated to classic two-wheelers from BMW Motorrad. The
vehicles offered for sale there include a BMW R51/3 from the 1950s and
a BMW R 60/5 from the touring motorcycle series presented in 1969. The
BMW R 51/3 was launched in the marketplace in 1951. Its completely
redesigned two-cylinder Boxer engine with a capacity of 500 cubic
centimetres was also a new development and impressed aficionados right
from the start with its smooth-running performance and high level of
reliability. BMW also explored new avenues with the /5 Series. The
models BMW R 50/5, BMW R 60/5 and BMW R 75/5 were designed as sporty
tourers styled in a modern design and they were fitted with a
completely new chassis incorporating a telescopic fork for the front
wheel and an adjustable rear-wheel suspension. Other innovations
included the electric starter and the fact that customers had a choice
of different colours for the first time. The launch of the /5 Series
also heralded the completion of relocating motorcycle production from
Munich to Berlin.

Snapshot of the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este 2019.

Visitors to Rétromobile 2019 also have an opportunity to get in the
mood for an absolute highlight in the calendar of the worldwide fan
community for classic cars. BMW Group Classic is presenting the
programme for the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este 2019. The beauty
contest for historic automobiles and motorcycles is being held from
24th to 26th May 2019 in Cernobbio, Northern Italy. It is being
presented under the motto “The Symphony of Engines – 90 Years of the
Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este & BMW Automobiles”. This recalls
the early beginnings of the vehicle show on the shores of Lake Como
and the origins of automobile production at BMW.

 

Original Press Release

MINI at the Brussels Motor Show 2019.

BMW:MINI at the Brussels Motor Show 2019.

British premium automobile manufacturer presents an exclusive design
model to mark the 60th anniversary of the brand along with the MINI
John Cooper Works, now fitted with a petrol engine particulate filter.

Munich. The MINI presentation at the Brussels Motor
Show 2019 is dedicated entirely to a round anniversary. The motor show
in the Belgian capital is the scene of the world premiere of the
MINI 60 Years Edition. With this exclusive design model, the British
premium automobile manufacturer recalls the debut of the classic Mini
in the year 1959. At that time, this economical and agile small car
laid the foundations for a worldwide brand success story that
continues to this day. 60 years on, MINI presents a model program to
the Brussels Motor Show visitors from 19 to 27 January that offers a
modern interpretation of the brand’s core properties. It ranges from
the first MINI to feature an electric motor through to the extremely
sporty John Cooper Works models.

The founding father and bestseller among the top athletes of the
model program is the MINI John Cooper Works (combined fuel
consumption: 6.9 – 6.9 l/100 km with 6-speed manual transmission,
6.2 – 6.1 l/ 100 km with 8-speed Steptronic gearbox; combined
CO2 emissions: 158 – 157 g/km with 6-speed manual
transmission, 142 – 140 g/km with 8-speed Steptronic transmission). At
the Brussels Motor Show 2019 MINI presents the new version of the 3
door, whose emissions output is now optimised by means of a standard
particulate filter.

Anniversary design model: the MINI 60 Years Edition.

With its exclusive design and equipment features, the MINI 60 Years
Edition – to be shown in public for the first time in Brussels –
authentically expresses the traditional sporting spirit and British
origins of the brand. A distinctive appearance is ensured by the body
colour British Racing Green IV, a contrasting finish on the roof and
exterior mirror caps, bonnet stripes in a specific anniversary design
and 17-inch light alloy wheels in the version 60 Years Spoke 2-tone.
The anniversary logo also appears on the side scuttles, door sill
finishers, front headrests and interior trim finishers as well as in
the LED logo projection on the driver’s side.

The standard equipment of the edition vehicles also features a sports
leather steering wheel as well as sports seats in the leather trim
MINI Yours Leather Lounge 60 Years and the exclusive colour Dark
Maroon. The MINI 60 Years Edition will be available from March 2019
onwards as a MINI 3 door and MINI 5 door, each with four engine variants.

MINI John Cooper Works now complying with Euro 6d-TEMP emissions standard.

The thrilling performance properties of the MINI John Cooper Works
powered by a 4-cylinder turbo engine with an output of 170 kW/231 hp
are now combined with further optimised emissions. Thanks to a
particulate filter integrated in the sports exhaust system, both the 3
door model and the MINI John Cooper Works Convertible (combined fuel
consumption: 7.1 – 7.0 l/100 km with 6-speed manual transmission,
6.5 – 6.4 l/ 100 km with 8-speed Steptronic transmission; combined
CO2 emissions: 162 – 161 g/km with 6-speed manual
transmission, 148 – 145 g/km with 8-speed Steptronic transmission) now
complies with the Euro 6d-TEMP emission standard.

Together with the two most recent additions to the brand’s program,
MINI will also be presenting a cross-section of its model range, which
currently comprises five series. The British original is represented
in the premium small car segment by the MINI 3 door, the MINI 5 door
and the MINI Convertible. And through the MINI Clubman and the MINI
Countryman, the brand’s individual style has also become established
beyond the premium compact segment. These models will also be on show
as part of the trade fair presentation in Brussels, including the
MINI Cooper S E Countryman ALL4 (combined fuel consumption:
2.5 – 2.4 l/100 km; combined CO2 emissions: 56 – 55 g/km,
combined power consumption: 13.7 – 13.4 kWh/100 km). The brand’s first
plug-in hybrid model enables a purely electrically powered range of up
to 41 – 42 kilometres, thereby already providing an impression of
locally emissions-free mobility combined with typical MINI driving fun.

The figures for fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, power
consumption and range are measured using the methods required
according to Regulation (EC) 2007/715 as amended. The information is
based on a vehicle with basic equipment in Germany; ranges take into
account differences in wheel and tyre size selected as well as
optional equipment and can change during configuration.

The information has already been calculated based on the new WLTP
test cycle and adapted to NEDC for comparison purposes. In these
vehicles, different figures than those published here may apply for
the assessment of taxes and other vehicle-related duties which are
(also) based on CO2 emissions.

For further details of the official fuel consumption figures and the
official specific CO2 emissions of new cars, please refer to the
“Manual on the fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and power
consumption of new cars” available free of charge at all sales
outlets, from Deutsche Automobil Treuhand GmbH (DAT),
Hellmuth-Hirth-Str. 1, 73760 Ostfildern-Scharnhausen and at https://www.dat.de/co2/.

In case of queries, please contact:

Press and PR



Matthias Bode, Press Officer Production Communication MINI

Telephone: +49-89-382-61742, Fax: +49-89-382-28567

E-mail: matthias.bode@mini.com

Andreas Lampka, Head of Communication MINI

Telephone: +49- 89-382-23662, Fax: +49 89-382-28567

 E-mail: andreas.lampka@mini.com

The BMW Group

With its four brands BMW, MINI, Rolls-Royce and BMW Motorrad, the BMW
Group is the world’s leading premium manufacturer of automobiles and
motorcycles and also provides premium financial and mobility services.
The BMW Group production network comprises 30 production and assembly
facilities in 14 countries; the company has a global sales network in
more than 140 countries.

In 2018, the BMW Group sold over 2,490,000 passenger vehicles and
more than 165,000 motorcycles worldwide. The profit before tax in the
financial year 2017 was € 10.655 billion on revenues amounting to
€ 98.678 billion. As of 31 December 2017, the BMW Group had a
workforce of 129,932 employees.

The success of the BMW Group has always been based on long-term
thinking and responsible action. The company has therefore established
ecological and social sustainability throughout the value chain,
comprehensive product responsibility and a clear commitment to
conserving resources as an integral part of its strategy.

www.bmwgroup.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/BMWGroup

Twitter: http://twitter.com/BMWGroup

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/BMWGroupView

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Original Press Release